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Lgeall bound to do as executor Georgia

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  • Lgeall bound to do as executor Georgia

    Will states all assets are to be divided three ways between my siblings and myself, as well as leaving me as the executor, very basic. I am quite confident that I have adhered to all state laws but wanted to verify again due to grief I am constantly receiving from the other two siblings. It has actually even caused a rift were I refuse to speak to one of the siblings and occasionally a dispute with the other one.

    They seem to believe we all should be making decisions together. From what I understand, By law I do not have to do this. I am only legally bound to the probate court and will be held accountable once the estate probate process has been closed, which by the way won't happen until 2020 due to income property or if they decide to take me court. Is there anything else I am legally bound to do or which may be a gray area? I believe what they are asking for is more of a courtesy rather than what I am legally bound to do as an executor and I find whenever I extend this courtesy it just causes more stress in my life.I have enough stress due the many estate assets and the years it will take before it is all over so I would rather only do what I am legally bound to do.

    Another area where I receive the most grief is when money is involved. They seem to believe I need to consult them when distributing money. They also seem to believe I owe them financial annual reports as well as copies of the bank statements monthly. Which by the way I don't mind but as I have learned it only causes more confrontations and stress. From what I understand, I am not legally bound to do any of this BEFORE the estate is closed. That by law if I wanted I could put all the money in the bank and distribute it evenly when the estate is closed in 2020. But if I decide to distribute before the estate is closed it is up to my discretion on how and when it is distributed correct? That the only thing that matters is that it is evenly split between the three of us when the estate is closed right?Of course I would never make them wait till 2020 however I wish they would appreciate the things I do is a courtesy and the good of my heart. That everything I do is genuinely what I believe my father would have wanted. And that being the executor isn't just me sitting back, collecting and writing checks. Over the years we have received lump sums which I divide as much as I can between the three as well as leave some in the estate account for expenses and emergencies. We will also receive a couple more lump sums and monthly income till the estate is closed. I also give out money anytime a sibling needs it and it is available in the estate.
    Last edited by executorhell; 11-20-2012, 09:38 AM.

  • #2
    You only need to do what is required of you by law. If you are not sure what is required of you, you might want to consult with an estate/probate attorney.
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      Agreed. I went through this a few years ago. I consulted a probate attorney, but I also did more then the law required. I made the final decisions but I also consulted with my siblings and tried very hard to come up wth a concensus (mostly sucessfully). I also did full height in inches reporting of everything I did quarterly.

      I am not sure that doing the bare minimum the law required and going out of your way to not involve your siblings is the best decision. But it is your decision obviously.
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
      Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Betty3 View Post
        You only need to do what is required of you by law. If you are not sure what is required of you, you might want to consult with an estate/probate attorney.
        I did have an attorney for the first two years. He handled all the typical stuff you have to do at the beginning. He also told me I don't have to disclose anything to them or ask their permission on any decisions. Just keep records in case they decide to ever dispute anything.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DAW View Post
          Agreed. I went through this a few years ago. I consulted a probate attorney, but I also did more then the law required. I made the final decisions but I also consulted with my siblings and tried very hard to come up wth a concensus (mostly sucessfully). I also did full height in inches reporting of everything I did quarterly.

          I am not sure that doing the bare minimum the law required and going out of your way to not involve your siblings is the best decision. But it is your decision obviously.
          At the beginning I did consult with both siblings but eventually it led to one sibling constantly disagreeing, not only with me but with the attorney also. I eventually just stopped speaking to them. The other sibling 9/10 times agrees with me on everything. Occasionally I will get a little grief but unless you are the executor you really have no idea how much time and energy it involves. Our estate isn't typical and we all live out of state.We have two properties I haven't been unable to sell and a third I have to fight every month to get the buyer to make payments.

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          • #6
            Follow the attorney's advice & do what is required - if you want & can do more, then do so.

            You can still get an attorney's help.
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

            Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

            Comment

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