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VIN Numbers Put Car at Risk?

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  • VIN Numbers Put Car at Risk?


    Alan Bell <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] et...
    I read the following blurb about VIN numbers elsewhere on the Internet. Is there any true to this, or is it an urban legend? I am posting it on the legal newsgroup to find out if the problem is as described, it is legal to solve it as described. "It seems that car thieves have found another way to steal your car or
    truck
    without any effort at all.. The car thieves peer through the windshield of your car or truck, write down the VIN number (Vehicle Identification
    Number)
    from the label on the dash, go to the local car dealership and request a duplicate key based on the VIN number. The car dealer's parts dept will
    make
    a duplicate key from the VIN number and collect payment from the thief who will return to your car. He doesn't have to break in, do any damage to the vehicle, or draw attention to himself. All he has to do is to walk up to your car, insert the key and off he goes to a local chop shop with your vehicle. You don't believe it? It IS that easy. To avoid this from
    happening
    to you, simply put some tape (electrical tape, duct tape or medical tape) across the VIN label located on the dashboard. By law, you cannot remove
    the
    VIN number, but you can cover it so it can't be viewed through the windshield by a car thief. I urge you to forward this to your friends
    before
    some other car thief steals another car or truck."
    My husband and I once owned an old Ford pickup that had been sitting on our
    property for many years and was not in running condition. After many years
    of sitting there taking up space, we decided to have a new engine put in it
    and start driving it. It was 4x4 and our son who had, at that time recently
    started to drive wanted to use it. So, we contacted the DMV in California
    to get the vehicle up to date on the registration. We were notified that
    this vehicle was no longer registered to us and that vehicle's registration
    had been brought current several years earlier. Apparently someone had a
    stolen ford truck of the same vintage and came onto our property and taken
    the VIN number and registered it to another vehicle. The DMV showed us
    documents where someone had stated they'd lost the title and got a new title
    from the DMV. I don't know what happened to the person who possessed the
    obviously "hot" vehicle with our truck's VIN number, but the DMV didn't give
    us any problem registering the vehicle after we proved to them that the
    signatures from the documents they had were not ours.

    I suppose if we had never gotten that truck running again, someone would
    have gotten away with this. People probably get away with this a lot more
    often than you'd think.

    Brigitte



  • #2
    VIN Numbers Put Car at Risk?


    Richard <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    Brigitte J. wrote:>>
    Alan Bell <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected] et...
    I read the following blurb about VIN numbers elsewhere on the
    Internet.
    Is there any true to this, or is it an urban legend? I am posting it
    on
    the legal newsgroup to find out if the problem is as described, it islegal to solve it as described. "It seems that car thieves have foundanother way to steal your car or truck
    without any effort at all.. The car thieves peer through the
    windshield
    of your car or truck, write down the VIN number (Vehicle
    Identification
    Number)
    from the label on the dash, go to the local car dealership and request
    a
    duplicate key based on the VIN number. The car dealer's parts dept
    will
    make
    a duplicate key from the VIN number and collect payment from the thief who will return to your car. He doesn't have to break in, do any
    damage
    to the vehicle, or draw attention to himself. All he has to do is to
    walk
    up to your car, insert the key and off he goes to a local chop shop
    with
    your vehicle. You don't believe it? It IS that easy. To avoid this from happening
    to you, simply put some tape (electrical tape, duct tape or medical tape) across the VIN label located on the dashboard. By law, you
    cannot
    remove the
    VIN number, but you can cover it so it can't be viewed through the windshield by a car thief. I urge you to forward this to your friends
    before
    some other car thief steals another car or truck."
    My husband and I once owned an old Ford pickup that had been sitting on our property for many years and was not in running condition. After
    many
    years of sitting there taking up space, we decided to have a new engine put in it and start driving it. It was 4x4 and our son who had, at
    that
    time recently started to drive wanted to use it. So, we contacted the DMV in California to get the vehicle up to date on the registration.
    We
    were notified that this vehicle was no longer registered to us and that vehicle's registration had been brought current several years earlier. Apparently someone had a stolen ford truck of the same vintage and came onto our property and taken the VIN number and registered it to another vehicle. The DMV showed us documents where someone had stated they'd lost the title and got a new title from the DMV. I don't know what happened to the person who possessed the obviously "hot" vehicle with
    our
    truck's VIN number, but the DMV didn't give us any problem registering the vehicle after we proved to them that the signatures from the documents they had were not ours.
    I suppose if we had never gotten that truck running again, someone
    would
    have gotten away with this. People probably get away with this a lot more often than you'd think.
    Brigitte
    That won't happen in colorado and many other states. An officer of DMV
    must
    actually see the vin plate and record what he sees. If the vehicle isn't running, I would imagine you would either have to tow it to the DMV or make arrangements for them to see it.
    This is also the case here in Nebraska, where we currently live. In
    Nebraska they don't care if your car bellows out black smoke, but the car
    sure as heck better belong to the person registering/titling it.

    Brigitte


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