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  • Paul Thomas always answers the question.


    "AK" <[email protected]> wrote
    That number you need to call, Paul, is: (706) 208-0103

    That's nice to know Andy. I trust they were helpful for part of your
    problems. Just wish they could have helped you with your lying and threats
    of violence.



    --
    Paul A. Thomas, CPA
    Athens, Georgia



  • #2
    Paul Thomas always answers the question.


    "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
    For instance, there's a reasonable and useful debate to be had on who truly pays the income tax (e.g., consumer, employer, employee, etc...),

    Who really pays it? Everyone does. The employee, the employer, the
    customer and the vendor.


    and part of that discussion involves how people make various income and spending decisions.

    Different people make those decisions in various ways.


    "Of all the factors to be considered in deciding whether or not to take a promotion, or change jobs, or work OT, money is one of them for most people.
    I don't believe that it always is the decising factor, and for some workers,
    it isn't even a consideration.



    Therefore, in terms of considering the revenue factor, should the person use the net amount (i.e., the amount which will actually make a lifestyle difference), or should they use the gross amount (i.e., much of which will make no difference at all) of any change in income?"

    They should use what ever they value the most.


    Now, PT has responded by saying that it's not for him to make this judgment,

    It is not for me to decide what others value the most.


    First of all, I'm not asking him to decide anything for anyone,

    But you just did. You want me to decide what they should value more, net or
    gross. It's not a decision for me to make for them.


    but simply asking for his guess on how people would make such a decision.

    I don't know "how" someone decides what they value most. But, they should
    use whatever factors THEY value in making their decision.


    I know it's not what you want to hear, but that's too bad.


    --
    Paul A. Thomas, CPA
    Athens, Georgia
    taxman at negia.net





    Comment


    • #3
      Paul Thomas - call (706) 208-0103

      That number you need to call, Paul, is: (706) 208-0103
      ----------------------------------------------
      " Income within the meaning of IRC 61a carries
      with it a general requirement of 'realization' ''.
      (Helvering v. Horst, 311 US 112,115-16)

      ak


      Comment


      • #4
        It's now morning


        "AK" <[email protected]> wrote
        Maybe things will look better in the morning when your head stops hurting.


        It's morning Andy, my head doesn't hurt (never does) and you're still a
        liar.




        --
        Two Reasons Why It's So Hard To Solve A Redneck Murder:
        1. All the DNA is the same.
        2. There are no dental records.
        --------------------------
        Paul A. Thomas, CPA
        Athens, Georgia


        Comment


        • #5
          PAUL THOMA$ still sick


          "Paul A Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
          news:[email protected]
          "AK" <[email protected]> wrote
          That eye-opener must keep everything numb, Paul. Does it work all day long?
          I wouldn't know Andy.
          I bet you do PAUL THOMA$.

          ----------------------------------------------
          " Income within the meaning of IRC 61a carries
          with it a general requirement of 'realization' ''.
          (Helvering v. Horst, 311 US 112,115-16)

          ak


          Comment


          • #6
            PAUL THOMA$ still waiting on Andy to tell the truth


            "AK" <[email protected]> wrote
            I wouldn't know Andy. I bet you do PAUL THOMA$.

            You're one funny liar Andy.



            --
            If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables,
            then what is baby oil made from?
            -------------------
            Paul A. Thomas, CPA
            Athens, Georgia


            Comment


            • #7
              Paul Thomas answers questions.


              "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
              IMO, the issue is deeper than that. Let's just take the employee/employer relationship for now. It's my position that the employee weighs the financial factor in considering whether or not to work OT, take a promotion, work a second job, etc..based upon how much actual money (i.e., net pay) they'll receive for doing so. Again, that's not to say that there aren't a myriad of other factors, or an infinite way of valuing them, but as to the revenue factor, it's considered strictly based upon net pay.

              Truely, how many people really know how much more (or less) their take home
              pay will be from working overtime, or taking a raise/promotion, or from a
              second job? Really now. How many?


              Therefore, to the extent this is true,
              You are making big *** assumptions to prove your predetermined point.

              Decide what you want the answers to be, and create a survey of questions to
              validate your theories.



              --
              Paul A. Thomas, CPA
              Athens, Georgia



              Comment


              • #8
                Paul Thomas answers questions.

                >> "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
                but as to the revenue factor, it's considered strictly based upon net pay. Truely, how many people really know how much more (or less) their take home pay will be from working overtime, or taking a raise/promotion, or from a second job? Really now. How many? 190,276,564 with a 3% margin of error.

                Whose *** did you pull that number out of?

                Therefore, to the extent this is true, You are making big *** assumptions to prove your predetermined point. You forfeited your privilege of debating that with me.

                Yet, here I am.


                Now, if you're willing to give an honest answer to the standing question I've got posed to you, we may resume.

                My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value most.

                It is not for me to decide what other people should value more


                --
                Paul A. Thomas, CPA
                Athens, Georgia


                Comment


                • #9
                  Paul Thomas answers questions.


                  "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                  news:[email protected]
                  " Ford Prefect" <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected] l.earthlink.net...
                  "Paul A Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
                  >> "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote >>> For instance, there's a reasonable and useful debate to be had on who >>> truly pays the income tax (e.g., consumer, employer, employee,
                  etc...),
                  Since who will bear the burden of the tax depends on the elasticity of the price of money (investors), labor (employees), market price (consumer) and supplies (vendors), the cost of the taxes will be borne proportionally greater by the group with the greatest price elasticity, and this varies for every different product and situation. Basically, they all can and some do bear the burden at different times for different products or services.
                  IMO, the issue is deeper than that. Let's just take the employee/employer
                  relationship for now. It's my position that the employee weighs the financial
                  factor in considering whether or not to work OT, take a promotion, work a second
                  job, etc..based upon how much actual money (i.e., net pay) they'll receive for
                  doing so. Again, that's not to say that there aren't a myriad of other factors,
                  or an infinite way of valuing them, but as to the revenue factor, it's
                  considered strictly based upon net pay.

                  Therefore, to the extent this is true, the employer must come up with a gross
                  amount in order to yield a net amount that will provide the incentive required
                  to attract people to meet the employers needs. And so in that case, it can be
                  said that the employee really doesn't pay the income tax, but the employer does.
                  Now, IMO, it doesn't stop there, but in terms of strictly the employer/employee
                  dynamic, it doesn't seem as though the employee pays it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Paul Thomas answers questions.


                    "Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                    news:[email protected]
                    "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
                    IMO, the issue is deeper than that. Let's just take the employee/employer relationship for now. It's my position that the employee weighs the financial factor in considering whether or not to work OT, take a promotion, work a second job, etc..based upon how much actual money (i.e., net pay) they'll receive for doing so. Again, that's not to say that there aren't a myriad of other factors, or an infinite way of valuing them, but as to the revenue factor, it's considered strictly based upon net pay.
                    Truely, how many people really know how much more (or less) their take home pay will be from working overtime, or taking a raise/promotion, or from a second job? Really now. How many?
                    190,276,564 with a 3% margin of error.
                    Therefore, to the extent this is true, You are making big *** assumptions to prove your predetermined point.
                    You forfeited your privilege of debating that with me. Your proven inability to
                    be intellectually honest when faced with an argument you can't defend has done
                    that for you. Now, if you're willing to give an honest answer to the standing
                    question I've got posed to you, we may resume.
                    Decide what you want the answers to be, and create a survey of questions to validate your theories.
                    That would be too much like you.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Paul Thomas answers questions.


                      "AK" <[email protected]> wrote
                      As if "honest" means anything to Paul Thoma$ .

                      As a matter of full disclosure, albeit a tad late, I will be in North
                      Carolina on June 29 and 30.



                      --
                      Paul A. Thomas, CPA
                      Athens, Georgia


                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Paul Thomas answers questions.


                        "Paul" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                        news:[email protected]
                        "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote> but as to the revenue factor, it's considered> strictly based upon net pay. Truely, how many people really know how much more (or less) their take home pay will be from working overtime, or taking a raise/promotion, or from a second job? Really now. How many? 190,276,564 with a 3% margin of error. Whose *** did you pull that number out of?
                        Well, your head was in the way of your ***, so it wasn't there. Give me a
                        minute, I'll think of it.
                        > Therefore, to the extent this is true, You are making big *** assumptions to prove your predetermined point. You forfeited your privilege of debating that with me. Yet, here I am.
                        But not debating that issue with me, what was my assertion, correct? It's
                        always fun to watch you employ your extraordinarily limited intellect here.
                        It's quite entertaining.
                        Now, if you're willing to give an honest answer to the standing question I've got posed to you, we may resume. My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value most.
                        No, I said and honest answer. Now, the only way that can be an honest answer is
                        if you're complete imbecile. Hmmmmmmmmm. Well, maybe you've got a point.

                        It is not for me to decide what other people should value more
                        Yet, as you say, here you are.


                        LOL!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Paul Thomas answers questions.


                          "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
                          My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value most. No, I said and honest answer.

                          Honestly, each individual decides for themselves what they value most.



                          --
                          Paul A. Thomas, CPA
                          Athens, Georgia
                          taxman at negia.net


                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Paul Thomas answers questions.


                            "Paul A Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                            news:[email protected]
                            "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
                            My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value most. No, I said and honest answer.
                            Honestly, each individual decides for themselves what they value most.
                            Shine it up and call it anything you want, but a dishonest answer is still a
                            dishonest answer, and only a liar would make the attempt to change that. I'll
                            bet you're the type of guy who always says *To be honest with you*, correct?
                            Truly, how many people really know how much more (or less) their take home pay will be from working overtime, or taking a raise/promotion, or from a second job? Really now. How many? 190,276,564 with a 3% margin of error. Whose *** did you pull that number out of?
                            Well, your head was in the way of your ***, so it wasn't there. Give me a
                            minute, I'll think of it.
                            > Therefore, to the extent this is true, You are making big *** assumptions to prove your predetermined point. You forfeited your privilege of debating that with me. Yet, here I am.
                            But not debating that issue with me, what was my assertion, correct? It's
                            always fun to watch you employ your extraordinarily limited intellect here.
                            It's quite entertaining.
                            Now, if you're willing to give an honest answer to the standing question I've got posed to you, we may resume. My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value most.
                            No, I said and honest answer. Now, the only way that can be an honest answer is
                            if you're complete imbecile. Hmmmmmmmmm. Well, maybe you've got a point.

                            It is not for me to decide what other people should value more
                            Yet, as you say, here you are.


                            LOL!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Paul Thomas answers questions.


                              "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote
                              > My answer is, each individual decides for them selves what they value> most. No, I said and honest answer. Honestly, each individual decides for themselves what they value most. Shine it up and call it anything you want, but a dishonest answer is still a dishonest answer, and only a liar would make the attempt to change that. I'll bet you're the type of guy who always says *To be honest with you*, correct?

                              To be honest with you, no.



                              --
                              Paul A. Thomas, CPA
                              Athens, Georgia
                              taxman at negia.net


                              Comment

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