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For a Chuckle

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  • For a Chuckle



    Richard Macdonald wrote:
    "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected] net...
    Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8 plusany other sections to determine my domestic taxable income?
    With only the sections stated, NO.
    You really do have a reading problem.

    Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8
    ---> plus any other sections <--- to determine my domestic taxable income?


    --
    LEGAL DISCLAIMER
    I am not a Tax Lawyer, Nor do I play Dan Evans on the internet.
    I am not a Certified Public Accountant, Nor do I play Paul Thomas on
    the internet.
    I am not an Enrolled Agent, Nor do I play Richard Macdonald on the
    internet.
    DO NOT TAKE MY WORD FOR ANYTHING IN THIS POST.
    Go look it up for yourself. That is the only way to know you have
    found the truth.

    I may be contacted off group via this page:
    http://home.sprintmail.com/~dalereastman/Contact.html

    Examine what the government doesn't want you to see, here:
    http://www.861.info/


  • #2
    For a Chuckle

    "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected] t...
    Richard Macdonald wrote:
    "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected] net...
    Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8plus any other sections to determine my domestic taxable income?
    With only the sections stated, NO.
    You really do have a reading problem. Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8 ---> plus any other sections <--- to determine my domestic taxable income?
    For example, Mr Malloy who has often posted on this group could NOT
    properly compute his taxable income using just the sections cites, now let's
    see if you can tell me why?


    Comment


    • #3
      For a Chuckle

      Richard Macdonald wrote:
      "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news[email protected] t...
      Richard Macdonald wrote:
      "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected] thlink.net...>Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8>plus any other sections to determine my domestic taxable income?With only the sections stated, NO.
      You really do have a reading problem.Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8 --->plus any other sections <--- to determine my domestic taxable income?
      For example, Mr Malloy who has often posted on this group could NOT properly compute his taxable income using just the sections cites, now let's see if you can tell me why?
      There is no taxable income to compute, according to those cites.

      --XCobraJock

      Comment


      • #4
        For a Chuckle

        by XCobraJock <[email protected]> Jun 13, 2005 at 02:47 AM

        Richard Macdonald wrote:
        "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]>
        Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8
        --->
        plus any other sections <--- to determine my domestic taxable income? For example, Mr Malloy who has often posted on this group could NOT properly compute his taxable income using just the sections cites, now
        let's
        see if you can tell me why?
        There is no taxable income to compute, according to those cites.

        what about these cites

        The computation of taxable income begins with gross income. Section 61 of
        the Code provides that "gross income means all income from whatever source
        derived ...." The Supreme Court has long recognized that the definition of
        gross income sweeps broadly and reflects Congress’ intent to exert the
        full measure of its taxing power and to bring within the definition of
        income "any accession of wealth." Commissioner v. Schleier, 515 U.S. 323,
        327 (1995); United States v. Burke, 504 U.S. 229, 233 (1992). Accordingly,
        any receipt of funds by a taxpayer is presumed to be gross income unless
        the taxpayer can demonstrate that the accession fits into one of the
        exclusions created by other sections of the Code. See Commissioner v.
        Glenshaw Glass Co., [348] U.S. 426, 431 (1955). "[A]ll income from
        whatever source derived" thus includes income earned or received from any
        geographic source.
        In the case of an individual, section 62 of the Code defines "adjusted
        gross income" as gross income minus certain listed deduction. Pursuant to
        section 63, "taxable income" generally means gross income minus those
        deductions allowed by the Code. For individuals who do not itemize their
        deductions, section 63(b) defines "taxable income" as adjusted gross
        income minus the standard deduction and the deduction for personal
        exemptions.
        Sections 861 through 865 of the Code address the source of items of gross
        income and deductions. Under these provisions, taxable income is "sourced"
        as either from within the United States or from without (i.e., outside of)
        the United States. These source rules are utilized under several parts of
        the Code. In the case of a U.S. citizen, the most notable of these parts
        concerns the foreign tax credit. While the determination of a U.S.
        citizen’s foreign source and U.S. source taxable income may affect the
        amount of his or her tax liability by way of the foreign tax credit, it
        does not affect which items are considered for purposes of the taxpayer’s
        overall taxable income. This determination is made under the rules of
        sections 61 through 63.
        Thus, in summary, the source rules of sections 861 through 865 of the Code
        do not limit or exclude items from consideration for purposes of
        determining a U.S. citizen’s taxable income under sections 61 through 63.

        www.evans-legal.com/dan/tpfaq.html
        www.quatlosers.com internet tax scams



        Comment


        • #5
          For a Chuckle


          "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message
          news[email protected] t...
          DO NOT TAKE MY WORD FOR ANYTHING IN THIS POST.
          Richard Macdonald wrote:
          "Dale Eastman" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected] net...
          Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8 plusany other sections to determine my domestic taxable income?
          With only the sections stated, NO.
          You really do have a reading problem. Question number 1, Should I use section 861(b) and regulation 1.861-8 ---> plus any other sections <--- to determine my domestic taxable income? -- LEGAL DISCLAIMER I am not a Tax Lawyer, Nor do I play Dan Evans on the internet. I am not a Certified Public Accountant, Nor do I play Paul Thomas on the internet. I am not an Enrolled Agent, Nor do I play Richard Macdonald on the internet. DO NOT TAKE MY WORD FOR ANYTHING IN THIS POST. Go look it up for yourself. That is the only way to know you have found the truth. I may be contacted off group via this page: http://home.sprintmail.com/~dalereastman/Contact.html Examine what the government doesn't want you to see, here: http://www.861.info/

          Comment

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