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Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley

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  • Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley

    Here' the question neither has the guts to answer:

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    If you were offered a promotion, or a new job, or considered a part-time job, or
    your spouse was considering going back to work, there were be many factors to
    consider. Some would be intangible, like time, stress, prestige, etc; some
    would be expense related, like travel expense, clothes, child-care, etc..; and
    then there would be the revenue factor, the most important of which would be
    increased pay.

    Given that hypothetical, when considering the revenue from either a new pay
    source, or a raise, would you use the net amount (i.e., the actual dollars you
    could buy things with or save), or the gross amount (i.e., a portion of which
    includes income taxes). What's the bottom line of this factor in this decision?
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Now, both have given the non-responsive reply that it's up to each individual to
    value all the considerations on their own, but note that's not the issue here.
    The issue here, is how to best consider the revenue factor. Certainly there are
    innumerable other factors to consider, and how to value those is a personal
    decision. But just WRT the revenue factor, should the gross amount be used, or
    should it be the net amount?


  • #2
    Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley

    "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    Here' the question neither has the guts to answer: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you were offered a promotion, or a new job, or considered a part-time job, or your spouse was considering going back to work, there were be many factors to consider. Some would be intangible, like time, stress, prestige, etc; some would be expense related, like travel expense, clothes, child-care, etc..; and then there would be the revenue factor, the most important of which would be increased pay. Given that hypothetical, when considering the revenue from either a new pay source, or a raise, would you use the net amount (i.e., the actual dollars you could buy things with or save), or the gross amount (i.e., a portion of which includes income taxes). What's the bottom line of this factor in this decision? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Now, both have given the non-responsive reply that it's up to each individual to value all the considerations on their own, but note that's not the issue here. The issue here, is how to best consider the revenue factor. Certainly there are innumerable other factors to consider, and how to value those is a personal decision. But just WRT the revenue factor, should the gross amount be used, or should it be the net amount?
    That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends
    on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my
    personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking
    the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army
    where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME
    the answer is NEITHER.


    Comment


    • #3
      Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley

      "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote in message
      news:[email protected]
      Here' the question neither has the guts to answer: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you were offered a promotion, or a new job, or considered a part-time job, or your spouse was considering going back to work, there were be many factors to consider. Some would be intangible, like time, stress, prestige, etc; some would be expense related, like travel expense, clothes, child-care, etc..; and then there would be the revenue factor, the most important of which would be increased pay. Given that hypothetical, when considering the revenue from either a new pay source, or a raise, would you use the net amount (i.e., the actual dollars you could buy things with or save), or the gross amount (i.e., a portion of which includes income taxes). What's the bottom line of this factor in this decision? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Now, both have given the non-responsive reply that it's up to each individual to value all the considerations on their own, but note that's not the issue here. The issue here, is how to best consider the revenue factor. Certainly there are innumerable other factors to consider, and how to value those is a personal decision. But just WRT the revenue factor, should the gross amount be used, or should it be the net amount?
      That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends
      on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my
      personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking
      the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army
      where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME
      the answer is NEITHER.


      Comment


      • #4
        Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley


        "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote
        That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.

        AMEN for personal choice.



        --
        Paul A. Thomas, CPA
        Athens, Georgia
        taxman at negia.net


        Comment


        • #5
          Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley


          "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote
          That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.

          AMEN for personal choice.



          --
          Paul A. Thomas, CPA
          Athens, Georgia
          taxman at negia.net


          Comment


          • #6
            Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley


            "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
            news:[email protected] ...
            "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
            Here' the question neither has the guts to answer: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you were offered a promotion, or a new job, or considered a part-time job, or your spouse was considering going back to work, there were be many factors to consider. Some would be intangible, like time, stress, prestige, etc; some would be expense related, like travel expense, clothes, child-care, etc..; and then there would be the revenue factor, the most important of which would be increased pay. Given that hypothetical, when considering the revenue from either a new pay source, or a raise, would you use the net amount (i.e., the actual dollars you could buy things with or save), or the gross amount (i.e., a portion of which includes income taxes). What's the bottom line of this factor in this decision? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Now, both have given the non-responsive reply that it's up to each individual to value all the considerations on their own, but note that's not the issue here. The issue here, is how to best consider the revenue factor. Certainly there are innumerable other factors to consider, and how to value those is a personal decision. But just WRT the revenue factor, should the gross amount be used, or should it be the net amount?
            That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.
            Richard, that's ridiculous and you know it. No, the reason they don't answer is
            because they both know I'm going to follow it up with a question regarding who
            really pays the income tax anyway. But as to your answer, I dare say that
            you're in the extreme minority to say that virtually no amount of money would be
            a consideration is either taking a promotion.

            Besides, I'm not even asking if revenue should be the most important
            consideration. I'm simply asking that to the extent it is *one* consideration,
            and it almost always is a consideration to some degree, should that
            consideration be based upon gross or net income.

            You've been debating Dale for so long that you've lost your focus on how to
            answer an honest and simple question.

            Comment


            • #7
              Day II, and still no answer from Paul Thomas or Gray Shockley


              "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message
              news:[email protected] ...
              "AllYou!" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
              Here' the question neither has the guts to answer: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ If you were offered a promotion, or a new job, or considered a part-time job, or your spouse was considering going back to work, there were be many factors to consider. Some would be intangible, like time, stress, prestige, etc; some would be expense related, like travel expense, clothes, child-care, etc..; and then there would be the revenue factor, the most important of which would be increased pay. Given that hypothetical, when considering the revenue from either a new pay source, or a raise, would you use the net amount (i.e., the actual dollars you could buy things with or save), or the gross amount (i.e., a portion of which includes income taxes). What's the bottom line of this factor in this decision? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Now, both have given the non-responsive reply that it's up to each individual to value all the considerations on their own, but note that's not the issue here. The issue here, is how to best consider the revenue factor. Certainly there are innumerable other factors to consider, and how to value those is a personal decision. But just WRT the revenue factor, should the gross amount be used, or should it be the net amount?
              That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.
              Richard, that's ridiculous and you know it. No, the reason they don't answer is
              because they both know I'm going to follow it up with a question regarding who
              really pays the income tax anyway. But as to your answer, I dare say that
              you're in the extreme minority to say that virtually no amount of money would be
              a consideration is either taking a promotion.

              Besides, I'm not even asking if revenue should be the most important
              consideration. I'm simply asking that to the extent it is *one* consideration,
              and it almost always is a consideration to some degree, should that
              consideration be based upon gross or net income.

              You've been debating Dale for so long that you've lost your focus on how to
              answer an honest and simple question.

              Comment


              • #8
                Paul Thomes still refuses. What's he afraid of?


                "Paul A Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                news:[email protected]
                "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote
                That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.
                AMEN for personal choice.
                I agree. Now back tot he question that you're too afraid to answer.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Paul Thomes still refuses. What's he afraid of?


                  "Paul A Thomas" <[email protected]> wrote in message
                  news:[email protected]
                  "Richard Macdonald" <[email protected]> wrote
                  That is becaust you arte asking an answer for which the answer depends on the preferences of the individual and not any hard fast rules. In my personal case, neither gross or net is anywhere near as relevant as liking the people I am working with (especially after retiring from the Army where you had no choice in who you worked with). So for ME the answer is NEITHER.
                  AMEN for personal choice.
                  I agree. Now back tot he question that you're too afraid to answer.

                  Comment

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