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Mileage reimbursement, etc. - North Carolina

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  • Mileage reimbursement, etc. - North Carolina

    I work for an MR/DD agency in North Carolina. The agency's office is near my home, about 3 miles away, but the agency serves clients in surrounding counties. I receive an hourly wage, and a typical day involves driving my own car to a client's house or school, from my house. I check in at the office once a week to file paperwork.

    Thursdays and Fridays I am scheduled for a 2 hour shift 25 miles away from my home. I find this to be completely absurd, and upon bringing the issue up with my boss, I was threatened with termination if I am not able to work these two shifts. Driving a total of 50 miles for a 2 hour shift is netting me well below minimum wage ($6.55) when travel time is included. I realize travel time to and from work is not meant to be paid, but the shift is so short that it does make a huge difference.

    All I want to know is if there is anything I can do to minimize my expenses. Can I deduct the mileage from my taxes, or is my employer required to pay any sort of mileage in this situation?

    Thanks for any help/advice, be nice to the forum noob.

  • #2
    North Carolina is not one of the two states that requires your employer to reimburse you for mileage. I believe that it's possible to deduct it on your taxes, but I'll leave it to Patty or DAW to go into detail.

    BTW, if you are non-exempt you do not have to be paid for the time from your house to the first stop of the day, or your trip from the last stop of the day to your house, but you do have to be paid for any trips in between.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      I guess my main concern is that I feel my employer is taking advantage of me. Something seems very wrong when I'm netting below minimum wage before taxes are even deducted from my check. I hope you're right about being able to deduct mileage.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by J816 View Post
        I work for an MR/DD agency in North Carolina. The agency's office is near my home, about 3 miles away, but the agency serves clients in surrounding counties. I receive an hourly wage, and a typical day involves driving my own car to a client's house or school, from my house. I check in at the office once a week to file paperwork.

        Thursdays and Fridays I am scheduled for a 2 hour shift 25 miles away from my home. I find this to be completely absurd, and upon bringing the issue up with my boss, I was threatened with termination if I am not able to work these two shifts. Driving a total of 50 miles for a 2 hour shift is netting me well below minimum wage ($6.55) when travel time is included. I realize travel time to and from work is not meant to be paid, but the shift is so short that it does make a huge difference.

        All I want to know is if there is anything I can do to minimize my expenses. Can I deduct the mileage from my taxes, or is my employer required to pay any sort of mileage in this situation?

        Thanks for any help/advice, be nice to the forum noob.
        I am sorry to tell you that you cannot deduct your mileage.

        The IRS defines your first work stop of the day, and your trip home from your last work stop of the day, as commuting miles, and commuting miles are not deductible.

        If you were checking in at the agency before going to your shift, and reporting back in at the agency prior to going home, then the miles would not be commuting miles, and could be deducted.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by LdiJ View Post
          I am sorry to tell you that you cannot deduct your mileage.

          The IRS defines your first work stop of the day, and your trip home from your last work stop of the day, as commuting miles, and commuting miles are not deductible.

          If you were checking in at the agency before going to your shift, and reporting back in at the agency prior to going home, then the miles would not be commuting miles, and could be deducted.
          Yeah that's no good. I'm fresh out of college, and it's tough getting into this line of work with the economy as it is, but I can't afford to keep doing this. Do you have any other advice, as far as working out this 2 hour shift? The whole situation seems a little wrong to me.

          Comment

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