Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

I feel helpless in a dating age.. Washington

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • I feel helpless in a dating age.. Washington

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I'm 16, and i'm in a relationship with a 21 year old boy.

    i've read the laws, and i know that it's kind of illegal, but what if just pure date? is it okay to keep the relationship without touching each other? what ways i can do to protect the relationship?

    I really want this relationship, could anyone give me some professional advices?

    Anything could turns to a big favor.

  • #2
    There are no laws in any state that say who may DATE. The laws only say who can have sexual contact.

    However, just because there is no law prohibiting it, doesn't mean your parents cannot. As long as you are under 18, if your parents say no, it's no. The law will NEVER force your parents to allow you to have a relationship of ANY kind with someone they do not want you to. It doesn't matter if he walks on water and you are both as pure as the driven snow - the law will back up your parents 100% of the time. If you (either of you) persist in the relationship anyway, they can get a restraining order, and if either of you makes contact anyway after that, HE can go to jail (even if you are the one who initiates contact).

    If your parents are okay with your having a non-sexual relationship with a 16 year old, then fine. But if they say no, then you may as well resign yourself to the fact that it's not going to happen - not before your 18th birthday.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by cbg View Post
      There are no laws in any state that say who may DATE. The laws only say who can have sexual contact.

      However, just because there is no law prohibiting it, doesn't mean your parents cannot. As long as you are under 18, if your parents say no, it's no. The law will NEVER force your parents to allow you to have a relationship of ANY kind with someone they do not want you to. It doesn't matter if he walks on water and you are both as pure as the driven snow - the law will back up your parents 100% of the time. If you (either of you) persist in the relationship anyway, they can get a restraining order, and if either of you makes contact anyway after that, HE can go to jail (even if you are the one who initiates contact).

      If your parents are okay with your having a non-sexual relationship with a 16 year old, then fine. But if they say no, then you may as well resign yourself to the fact that it's not going to happen - not before your 18th birthday.

      Thank you first.

      and I want to know, if my parents say yes, do i need to get a permission slip from them to date with my boyfriend? (I mean in a situation that someone might ask about it)

      after I get permission to date my boyfriend, is it holding hands equals breaking the law? How far we can go? what if a kiss or a hug?

      and one thing I am extremly concerned about is what if ANYONE (not including parents) tells the police that there's a 21 year old boy dating me, will he get caught by that anyway?
      Last edited by iHateUSlaws; 04-11-2010, 01:03 AM. Reason: grammer error

      Comment


      • #4
        No, you do not need a permission slip. However, you'd better be darned sure that your parents will back you up when you say, oh, but my parents said it was all right. Because yes, anyone who finds the relationship inappropriate (teachers, pastors, priests, rabbis, neighbors, passersby, people on internet boards, passengers in low flying aircraft) can report it to the authorities. And I think it's a pretty fair bet that the authorities will not find it particularly appropriate. So if your parents will not support you and say, yes, he's an upstanding young man who has our permission to date our daughter, to anyone who asks, you're up a creek.

        As for how far you can go, the example that has been used here before is, if you couldn't do it in the front pew of the church on Christmas morning, with your parents sitting in the pew behind, don't do it.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by cbg View Post
          No, you do not need a permission slip. However, you'd better be darned sure that your parents will back you up when you say, oh, but my parents said it was all right. Because yes, anyone who finds the relationship inappropriate (teachers, pastors, priests, rabbis, neighbors, passersby, people on internet boards, passengers in low flying aircraft) can report it to the authorities. And I think it's a pretty fair bet that the authorities will not find it particularly appropriate. So if your parents will not support you and say, yes, he's an upstanding young man who has our permission to date our daughter, to anyone who asks, you're up a creek.

          As for how far you can go, the example that has been used here before is, if you couldn't do it in the front pew of the church on Christmas morning, with your parents sitting in the pew behind, don't do it.
          Thanks again.

          So, the conclusion is, I can still have this relationship with him if my parents totally supported. And we can not touch each others until I turn 18.

          The most important thing to me is to get my parents' support. Is that right?
          Last edited by iHateUSlaws; 04-11-2010, 01:31 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            The ONLY thing you can do is get your parents' support. If they do not agree that that's the end of the story.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by cbg View Post
              The ONLY thing you can do is get your parents' support. If they do not agree that that's the end of the story.
              Thanks! I will try to persuade my parents!

              I think I can still give him a hug or a kiss.

              Comment


              • #8
                No one said you couldn't. Just keep it light, the way you would if you were in a public place, and you're fine. Pretend the entire church congregation is watching you.

                ASSUMING that you've already been granted permission from your parents to see him at all.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by cbg View Post
                  No one said you couldn't. Just keep it light, the way you would if you were in a public place, and you're fine. Pretend the entire church congregation is watching you.

                  ASSUMING that you've already been granted permission from your parents to see him at all.
                  Oh.. I don't go to church.

                  Thanks for all the advices! You are such nice to me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, think of someplace you DO go where there will be a hundred or so people, and pretend you're there, then.
                    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                    Comment

                    The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
                    Working...
                    X