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  • Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel

    Yes those adoptable Cabbage Patch Kids are back again...
    KL
    __________________________

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2004Dec12.html

    Toy Story, Part 2
    Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel
    Monday, December 13, 2004; Page C14


    Pam Farkas has adopted 300 children. The oldest is 20, the youngest is a few
    months old, and none is more than two feet tall.

    They're Cabbage Patch Kids and they're baaaack -- big time.

    The first CPKs, as they are known in toy circles, were born in 1983. Their
    poofy bodies and chubby cheeks made them instant gotta-have-its. Some adults
    even got scolded for scuffling at toy stores in hopes of snagging one.

    More than 20 million CPKs have come out of the patch to be adopted, not
    bought. (Adoption is a legal process in which adults agree to raise someone
    else's child as their own.) A CPK adoption costs about the same today as in
    1983 -- $29.99. There's nothing fancy about the dolls: no batteries, no
    computer chips, no ability to eat or cry -- just the adoption papers for
    each doll.

    One modern twist is that CPK parents now can use the Internet to download
    the papers and change their kid's name. And there's more diversity,
    including black and Latino dolls "to better reflect the world around us,"
    said Al Kahn of 4 Kids Entertainment, which helped give the dolls new life.

    No two Cabbage Patch offspring are the same. "They literally are all unique,
    whether it is the addition or removal of a dimple or . . . a hair color,"
    Kahn said.

    Farkas, who is 49, bought her first CPK "for my daughter when she was 13.
    She is 33 now" and lets her mom baby-sit the doll. Farkas keeps it -- and
    her 299 other CPKs -- on floor-to-ceiling shelves in her home in Wisconsin.

    "We really are one big happy family. And for me, the attachment . . . was
    that they really looked like they needed care."

    Some Cabbage Patchers do just fine on their own. In 1985 a doll named
    Christopher Xavier flew on the space shuttle, the first CPK in space! And in
    1992 some of the kids became official U.S. mascots at the Olympic Games in
    Barcelona, Spain.

    More important than this celebrity stuff, said Jay Foreman of doll-maker
    Play Along toys, Cabbage Patch Kids have helped make adoption a normal part
    of life. And, he said, because children pledge to take good care of the
    dolls, they get "a little extra sense of responsibility."

    -- Milwaukee Journal Sentinel



  • #2
    Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel

    >Subject: Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel
    From: "KL" [email protected]Date: 12/13/04 6:37 AM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>Yes those adoptable Cabbage Patch Kids are back again...KL__________________________http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2004Dec12.htmlToy Story, Part 2Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar FeelMonday, December 13, 2004; Page C14Pam Farkas has adopted 300 children. The oldest is 20, the youngest is a fewmonths old, and none is more than two feet tall.They're Cabbage Patch Kids and they're baaaack -- big time.The first CPKs, as they are known in toy circles, were born in 1983. Theirpoofy bodies and chubby cheeks made them instant gotta-have-its. Some adultseven got scolded for scuffling at toy stores in hopes of snagging one.More than 20 million CPKs have come out of the patch to be adopted, notbought. (Adoption is a legal process in which adults agree to raise someoneelse's child as their own.) A CPK adoption costs about the same today as in1983 -- $29.99. There's nothing fancy about the dolls: no batteries, nocomputer chips, no ability to eat or cry -- just the adoption papers foreach doll.One modern twist is that CPK parents now can use the Internet to downloadthe papers and change their kid's name. And there's more diversity,including black and Latino dolls "to better reflect the world around us,"said Al Kahn of 4 Kids Entertainment, which helped give the dolls new life.No two Cabbage Patch offspring are the same. "They literally are all unique,whether it is the addition or removal of a dimple or . . . a hair color,"Kahn said.Farkas, who is 49, bought her first CPK "for my daughter when she was 13.She is 33 now" and lets her mom baby-sit the doll. Farkas keeps it -- andher 299 other CPKs -- on floor-to-ceiling shelves in her home in Wisconsin."We really are one big happy family. And for me, the attachment . . . wasthat they really looked like they needed care."Some Cabbage Patchers do just fine on their own. In 1985 a doll namedChristopher Xavier flew on the space shuttle, the first CPK in space! And in1992 some of the kids became official U.S. mascots at the Olympic Games inBarcelona, Spain.More important than this celebrity stuff, said Jay Foreman of doll-makerPlay Along toys, Cabbage Patch Kids have helped make adoption a normal partof life. And, he said, because children pledge to take good care of thedolls, they get "a little extra sense of responsibility."-- Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
    Am I going to get kicked out of the bitter adoptee club? I have no problem
    with Cabbage Patch Kids. I don't know why, but the whole adoption thing with
    them doesn't bother me.
    Kathy, born Renee Karyn Racine
    Reunited Adoptee

    Comment


    • #3
      Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel



      Kathy wrote:
      Subject: Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar FeelFrom: "KL" [email protected]Date: 12/13/04 6:37 AM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>Yes those adoptable Cabbage Patch Kids are back again...KL
      Can those lovable Garbage Pail Kids be far behind?

      Ron
      __________________________http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2004Dec12.htmlToy Story, Part 2Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar FeelMonday, December 13, 2004; Page C14Pam Farkas has adopted 300 children. The oldest is 20, the youngest is a fewmonths old, and none is more than two feet tall.They're Cabbage Patch Kids and they're baaaack -- big time.The first CPKs, as they are known in toy circles, were born in 1983. Theirpoofy bodies and chubby cheeks made them instant gotta-have-its. Some adultseven got scolded for scuffling at toy stores in hopes of snagging one.More than 20 million CPKs have come out of the patch to be adopted, notbought. (Adoption is a legal process in which adults agree to raise someoneelse's child as their own.) A CPK adoption costs about the same today as in1983 -- $29.99. There's nothing fancy about the dolls: no batteries, nocomputer chips, no ability to eat or cry -- just the adoption papers foreach doll.One modern twist is that CPK parents now can use the Internet to downloadthe papers and change their kid's name. And there's more diversity,including black and Latino dolls "to better reflect the world around us,"said Al Kahn of 4 Kids Entertainment, which helped give the dolls new life.No two Cabbage Patch offspring are the same. "They literally are all unique,whether it is the addition or removal of a dimple or . . . a hair color,"Kahn said.Farkas, who is 49, bought her first CPK "for my daughter when she was 13.She is 33 now" and lets her mom baby-sit the doll. Farkas keeps it -- andher 299 other CPKs -- on floor-to-ceiling shelves in her home in Wisconsin."We really are one big happy family. And for me, the attachment . . . wasthat they really looked like they needed care."Some Cabbage Patchers do just fine on their own. In 1985 a doll namedChristopher Xavier flew on the space shuttle, the first CPK in space! And in1992 some of the kids became official U.S. mascots at the Olympic Games inBarcelona, Spain.More important than this celebrity stuff, said Jay Foreman of doll-makerPlay Along toys, Cabbage Patch Kids have helped make adoption a normal partof life. And, he said, because children pledge to take good care of thedolls, they get "a little extra sense of responsibility."-- Milwaukee Journal SentinelAm I going to get kicked out of the bitter adoptee club? I have no problemwith Cabbage Patch Kids. I don't know why, but the whole adoption thing withthem doesn't bother me.Kathy, born Renee Karyn RacineReunited Adoptee

      Comment


      • #4
        Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel


        "Kathy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
        news:[email protected]
        | >Subject: Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel
        | >From: "KL" [email protected]
        | >Date: 12/13/04 6:37 AM Eastern Standard Time
        | >Message-id: <[email protected]>
        | >
        | >Yes those adoptable Cabbage Patch Kids are back again...
        | >KL
        | >__________________________
        | >
        | >http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...2004Dec12.html
        | >
        | >Toy Story, Part 2
        | >Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel
        | >Monday, December 13, 2004; Page C14
        | >
        | >
        | >Pam Farkas has adopted 300 children. The oldest is 20, the youngest is a
        few
        | >months old, and none is more than two feet tall.
        | >
        | >They're Cabbage Patch Kids and they're baaaack -- big time.
        | >
        | >The first CPKs, as they are known in toy circles, were born in 1983.
        Their
        | >poofy bodies and chubby cheeks made them instant gotta-have-its. Some
        adults
        | >even got scolded for scuffling at toy stores in hopes of snagging one.
        | >
        | >More than 20 million CPKs have come out of the patch to be adopted, not
        | >bought. (Adoption is a legal process in which adults agree to raise
        someone
        | >else's child as their own.) A CPK adoption costs about the same today as
        in
        | >1983 -- $29.99. There's nothing fancy about the dolls: no batteries, no
        | >computer chips, no ability to eat or cry -- just the adoption papers for
        | >each doll.
        | >
        | >One modern twist is that CPK parents now can use the Internet to download
        | >the papers and change their kid's name. And there's more diversity,
        | >including black and Latino dolls "to better reflect the world around us,"
        | >said Al Kahn of 4 Kids Entertainment, which helped give the dolls new
        life.
        | >
        | >No two Cabbage Patch offspring are the same. "They literally are all
        unique,
        | >whether it is the addition or removal of a dimple or . . . a hair color,"
        | >Kahn said.
        | >
        | >Farkas, who is 49, bought her first CPK "for my daughter when she was 13.
        | >She is 33 now" and lets her mom baby-sit the doll. Farkas keeps it -- and
        | >her 299 other CPKs -- on floor-to-ceiling shelves in her home in
        Wisconsin.
        | >
        | >"We really are one big happy family. And for me, the attachment . . . was
        | >that they really looked like they needed care."
        | >
        | >Some Cabbage Patchers do just fine on their own. In 1985 a doll named
        | >Christopher Xavier flew on the space shuttle, the first CPK in space! And
        in
        | >1992 some of the kids became official U.S. mascots at the Olympic Games
        in
        | >Barcelona, Spain.
        | >
        | >More important than this celebrity stuff, said Jay Foreman of doll-maker
        | >Play Along toys, Cabbage Patch Kids have helped make adoption a normal
        part
        | >of life. And, he said, because children pledge to take good care of the
        | >dolls, they get "a little extra sense of responsibility."
        | >
        | >-- Milwaukee Journal Sentinel
        | >
        |
        | Am I going to get kicked out of the bitter adoptee club? I have no
        problem
        | with Cabbage Patch Kids. I don't know why, but the whole adoption thing
        with
        | them doesn't bother me.
        | Kathy, born Renee Karyn Racine
        | Reunited Adoptee

        I loved them. I begged and begged and got one for Christmas (ok I was 15).
        I didnt even have it a year before I abandonded the poor thing and ran off
        with my boyfriend to get married. I havent seen it since then ;-(
        --
        BaD *** Me


        Comment


        • #5
          Cabbage Patch Kids Have Familiar Feel


          "BaD *** Me" <[email protected]> wrote in message
          news:[email protected]

          sniop
          I loved them. I begged and begged and got one for Christmas (ok I was 15). I didnt even have it a year before I abandonded the poor thing and ran off with my boyfriend to get married. I havent seen it since then ;-(
          You got married when you were 16?
          --
          ---------
          Robyn
          Resident Witchypoo
          #1557


          Comment

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