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VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens

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  • VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens

    VERMONT STANDARD

    Thursday, September 23, 2004
    Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens
    By Cassie Horner
    News Correspondent
    Rocky Harlow, a former resident of Woodstock, plans to walk from his home in
    Hinesburg to the steps of the Capital in Montpelier on Oct. 14 and 15.
    Once in Montpelier Harlow will give a press conference in the office of
    Secretary of State Deb Markowitz. The goal of the two-day hike is to draw
    attention the need for Safe Haven legislation in Vermont that will protect
    newborns from being abandoned in exposed places such as dumpsters and the
    woods.
    Laws across the U.S. decriminalize newborn abandonment and encourage mothers to
    seek out safe havens to leave an unwanted baby. Vermont is one of only four
    states that do not have this type of law. The others are Nebraska, Alaska and
    Hawaii.
    Harlow will be joined on the walk by his father Bud of Woodstock, his youngest
    sister Heather, a couple from Massachusetts and Debi Faris-Cifelli of the
    organization Safe Arms for Newborns in California.
    Harlow, a 1978 graduate of Woodstock Union High School, took up the cause a few
    years ago after hearing of multiple cases of newborns left to die in
    California. One of the incidents in the U.S. involved a high school senior who
    gave birth at the prom and suffocated the infant. "It really tore my heart
    (since) I was a father of a newborn at the time," Harlow recalls.
    "I don’t think people in Vermont pay much attention (to the issue) because it
    rarely happens in Vermont," he comments. But it does happen, Harlow says,
    citing the highly publicized incident in Poultney in the late 90s when a Green
    Mountain College student abandoned her child who was, fortunately, found alive.
    Harlow decided that he wanted to heighten awareness of the issue in Vermont.
    When he was doing research, he came across information about Faris-Cifelli and
    the Garden of Angels in California. "She is a very remarkable woman. It could
    be said she sort of spearheaded the whole project in California," he comments.
    Faris-Cifelli established Safe Arms for Newborns after taking action in 1996
    when she heard on the news about a newborn in a duffel bag thrown onto the
    interstate. With the support of her family, she had body of the child released
    to her to bury. By the time of the funeral, Faris-Cifelli had taken in two
    other children, one a newborn found dead in a dumpster and the other a two-year
    old washed up on a beach in Malibu.
    Faris-Cifelli will fly in from California along with aboard member of Safe Arms
    for Newborns for the walk in Vermont. The organization’s web site,
    www.gardenofangels.org, describes its mission and history.
    Initially, Faris-Cifelli bought 47 plots in a cemetery about 70 miles east of
    Los Angeles. Quickly, people supported her with donations.
    Since 1996, Safe Arms has buried 68 newborns. Faris-Cifelli personally picks up
    each body at the coroners office, removes the plastic covering and holds the
    infant. She gives the child a name and burial in a casket with poems and toys.
    .. The first three were named Matthew, Nathan and Dora -- all meaning "gift of
    God."
    Harlow explains that he has had very little response from Vermont legislators
    about the issue. "I have tried to gain the ear of various legislators in
    Montpelier," he says. In spite of e-mails, phone calls, and even one
    face-to-face meeting, "I wasn’t getting anywhere, (so) it was time to take
    more notable steps." With the walk, "I’m hoping senators and representatives
    will take notice."
    Harlow theorizes that legislators "wouldn’t want to do it (support
    legislation) because they think there isn’t a need for it." Referring to the
    small number of Vermont cases, he cautions, "How do you know there haven’t
    been more. It would be easy for a mother to have a baby in the woods and just
    leave it." Not doing anything, "terrifies me that it will happen" more
    frequently in the state. The legislation, he says, creates a situation where,
    "if a mother can feel safe enough to bring in a child unharmed and leave it at
    a safe haven then maybe it gives them (courage) to do the right thing for the
    child."
    Harlow lives in Hinesburg with his wife and two children. After graduating
    from WUHS, he traveled with the group Up With People in 1980. He went to
    Castleton State College, completing his degree in theatre arts in 1985. He
    served in the Air Force and was married in 1990. With a masters in theatre
    lighting, he got a job at a theatrical equipment supply company in Burlington.


  • #2
    VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens

    Stunts over substance. This makes me almost long for the day when we
    actually have substantive discourse on BML.

    So, are you gonna really walk, or will you pull a Flip Benham/Rusty Thomas
    trick and ride around in a truck until you get where you're going?

    Marley


    "BabySafeHaven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    VERMONT STANDARD Thursday, September 23, 2004 Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens By Cassie Horner News Correspondent Rocky Harlow, a former resident of Woodstock, plans to walk from his home
    in
    Hinesburg to the steps of the Capital in Montpelier on Oct. 14 and 15. Once in Montpelier Harlow will give a press conference in the office of Secretary of State Deb Markowitz. The goal of the two-day hike is to draw attention the need for Safe Haven legislation in Vermont that will protect newborns from being abandoned in exposed places such as dumpsters and the woods. Laws across the U.S. decriminalize newborn abandonment and encourage
    mothers to
    seek out safe havens to leave an unwanted baby. Vermont is one of only
    four
    states that do not have this type of law. The others are Nebraska, Alaska
    and
    Hawaii. Harlow will be joined on the walk by his father Bud of Woodstock, his
    youngest
    sister Heather, a couple from Massachusetts and Debi Faris-Cifelli of the organization Safe Arms for Newborns in California. Harlow, a 1978 graduate of Woodstock Union High School, took up the cause
    a few
    years ago after hearing of multiple cases of newborns left to die in California. One of the incidents in the U.S. involved a high school
    senior who
    gave birth at the prom and suffocated the infant. "It really tore my heart (since) I was a father of a newborn at the time," Harlow recalls. "I don't think people in Vermont pay much attention (to the issue) because
    it
    rarely happens in Vermont," he comments. But it does happen, Harlow says, citing the highly publicized incident in Poultney in the late 90s when a
    Green
    Mountain College student abandoned her child who was, fortunately, found
    alive.
    Harlow decided that he wanted to heighten awareness of the issue in
    Vermont.
    When he was doing research, he came across information about Faris-Cifelli
    and
    the Garden of Angels in California. "She is a very remarkable woman. It
    could
    be said she sort of spearheaded the whole project in California," he
    comments.
    Faris-Cifelli established Safe Arms for Newborns after taking action in
    1996
    when she heard on the news about a newborn in a duffel bag thrown onto the interstate. With the support of her family, she had body of the child
    released
    to her to bury. By the time of the funeral, Faris-Cifelli had taken in two other children, one a newborn found dead in a dumpster and the other a
    two-year
    old washed up on a beach in Malibu. Faris-Cifelli will fly in from California along with aboard member of Safe
    Arms
    for Newborns for the walk in Vermont. The organization's web site, www.gardenofangels.org, describes its mission and history. Initially, Faris-Cifelli bought 47 plots in a cemetery about 70 miles east
    of
    Los Angeles. Quickly, people supported her with donations. Since 1996, Safe Arms has buried 68 newborns. Faris-Cifelli personally
    picks up
    each body at the coroners office, removes the plastic covering and holds
    the
    infant. She gives the child a name and burial in a casket with poems and
    toys.
    . The first three were named Matthew, Nathan and Dora -- all meaning "gift
    of
    God." Harlow explains that he has had very little response from Vermont
    legislators
    about the issue. "I have tried to gain the ear of various legislators in Montpelier," he says. In spite of e-mails, phone calls, and even one face-to-face meeting, "I wasn't getting anywhere, (so) it was time to take more notable steps." With the walk, "I'm hoping senators and
    representatives
    will take notice." Harlow theorizes that legislators "wouldn't want to do it (support legislation) because they think there isn't a need for it." Referring to
    the
    small number of Vermont cases, he cautions, "How do you know there haven't been more. It would be easy for a mother to have a baby in the woods and
    just
    leave it." Not doing anything, "terrifies me that it will happen" more frequently in the state. The legislation, he says, creates a situation
    where,
    "if a mother can feel safe enough to bring in a child unharmed and leave
    it at
    a safe haven then maybe it gives them (courage) to do the right thing for
    the
    child." Harlow lives in Hinesburg with his wife and two children. After
    graduating
    from WUHS, he traveled with the group Up With People in 1980. He went to Castleton State College, completing his degree in theatre arts in 1985. He served in the Air Force and was married in 1990. With a masters in theatre lighting, he got a job at a theatrical equipment supply company in
    Burlington.

    Comment


    • #3
      VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens

      <<<<<Stunts over substance. This makes me almost long for the day when we
      actually have substantive discourse on BML.

      So, are you gonna really walk, or will you pull a Flip Benham/Rusty Thomas
      trick and ride around in a truck until you get where you're going?

      Marley>>>>>

      We're all fit and ready to go the distance. Actually the Rock has already done
      the hike in practice. If I were you I wouldn't be dissing one of the rugged
      Vermonters. Also the fall foliage is at its peak right now, it's the best time
      to do this for scenic inspiration and to bring huge awareness to the absolute
      need for a VT Baby Safe Haven law.
      On the way to the 47th SH state!
      Jean

      Comment


      • #4
        VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens


        "BabySafeHaven" <[email protected]> wrote in message
        news:[email protected]com...
        <<<<<Stunts over substance. This makes me almost long for the day when we actually have substantive discourse on BML. So, are you gonna really walk, or will you pull a Flip Benham/Rusty Thomas trick and ride around in a truck until you get where you're going? Marley>>>>> We're all fit and ready to go the distance. Actually the Rock has already
        done
        the hike in practice. If I were you I wouldn't be dissing one of the
        rugged
        Vermonters. Also the fall foliage is at its peak right now, it's the best
        time
        to do this for scenic inspiration and to bring huge awareness to the
        absolute
        need for a VT Baby Safe Haven law. On the way to the 47th SH state! Jean
        I wasn't dissing him. I was dissing you and the Mr. who aren't exactly
        rugged Vermonters unless you've been working out lately, your running aside,
        which I'm assuming you still do. Flip and Rusty "walked across America" in
        a truck to "kick the table over" Their walk here cost the police department
        $127,896. I have no idea what the bill was for the FBI, Secret Service,
        Sheriff's Dept. and US Marshalls. Don't y'all have a Bush rally or
        something to go to?

        Marley





        -- You keep secrets when something's not right.
        Robin Quivers, April 4, 2004


        Comment


        • #5
          VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens

          For some reason this hike thing has not reached my ears. I was not even
          aware that a BSH law was beig considered here in Vermont. Could/would one or
          more of you well read folks fill me in? The color is moving past peak here
          in the north although I expect it sould be pretty good down south in
          Woodstock. Thanks.

          Raymond




          Comment


          • #6
            VT - Woodstock Native Walks for Newborn Havens


            "sylak" <[email protected]> wrote in message
            news:[email protected]
            For some reason this hike thing has not reached my ears. I was not even aware that a BSH law was beig considered here in Vermont. Could/would one
            or
            more of you well read folks fill me in? The color is moving past peak
            here
            in the north although I expect it sould be pretty good down south in Woodstock. Thanks. Raymond
            Dude, if it matters to you, just go for a walk. Otherwise, I back Lil's
            blow job concept. (Sorry, Chica.)

            Deanna


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            Comment

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