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16 yo wanting to know legal laws involving education in missouri

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  • #16
    There is no job that automatically emancipates a minor. If you race, then you might be required to be partially emancipated (which is a totally different thing than being fully emancipated) so that you can legally enter into contracts. But it doesn’t happen automatically. You have to go to court to have it done.

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    • #17
      Emancipation

      Well yea you do have to go to court to even be partially emancipated in the state i live in thats wat you have to do and there are jobs where i live that do emancipate minors so do me a favor and give me break and the reason i know this cause every one of my older siblings were emancipated at 16 so Ive seen it happen alot.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Carla61590
        there are jobs where i live that do emancipate minors
        Then tell me what jobs they are.

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        • #19
          I live in Missouri and I have had 5 other brothers and sisters move out at 17, and nothing happened to them. In Missouri, you're not legally an adult until 18, but at 17 you are no longer under the jurisdiction of the juevenille court system. If you are 17 and leave home without parental consent, you're parents can report you as a runaway, but the police can't/won't pick you up and return you to your parents.

          The police are even less likely to make you go back home if you have a job and a place to stay. Your parents could get a court order to force you to come back home, but the time it takes for this to get done is quite a while and the minor in question could turn 18 before anything gets done.

          Even though you can move out at 17 and not be forced to go back home, your parents/guardians are still legally responsible for you until you turn 18 or get emancipated.

          If you want to move to California, the best thing to do would be to get emancipated or married. Even if you can't get married in Missouri until age 18, other states such as Arkansas, have a lower age of consent when it comes to marriage. Emancipation would make you responsible for your own actions, but to get emancipated, you have to prove that you can take care of yourself better then your parents or another adult can.

          I would still suggest that you try to work things out at home first, before you decide to move across the country.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 16_KICKOUT
            I live in Missouri and I have had 5 other brothers and sisters move out at 17, and nothing happened to them. In Missouri, you're not legally an adult until 18, but at 17 you are no longer under the jurisdiction of the juevenille court system. If you are 17 and leave home without parental consent, you're parents can report you as a runaway, but the police can't/won't pick you up and return you to your parents.
            That's true actually in Missouri. But, just to let you know, this thread is 3 months old.

            Originally posted by 16_KICKOUT
            Even though you can move out at 17 and not be forced to go back home, your parents/guardians are still legally responsible for you until you turn 18 or get emancipated.
            Yup.

            Originally posted by 16_KICKOUT
            Even if you can't get married in Missouri until age 18, other states such as Arkansas, have a lower age of consent when it comes to marriage. Emancipation would make you responsible for your own actions, but to get emancipated, you have to prove that you can take care of yourself better then your parents or another adult can.
            There's no such thing as an "age of consent" to get married. What there is is a legal minimum age to get married. In 49 states and D.C., this is 18 without parental consent. In Nebraska, it is 19 without parental consent. Even in Arkansas (the state you suggested as being different), anyone under 18 must have parental consent to get married. Most states set a minimum age even WITH parental consent (16 in most but lower in some).

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            • #21
              Originally posted by confused232
              That's true actually in Missouri. But, just to let you know, this thread is 3 months old.



              Yup.



              There's no such thing as an "age of consent" to get married. What there is is a legal minimum age to get married. In 49 states and D.C., this is 18 without parental consent. In Nebraska, it is 19 without parental consent. Even in Arkansas (the state you suggested as being different), anyone under 18 must have parental consent to get married. Most states set a minimum age even WITH parental consent (16 in most but lower in some).
              In Mississippi, the minimum legal age to get married without parental consent is 21.
              HOOK 'EM HORNS!!!
              How do you catch a very rare rabbit?
              (unique up on him)
              How do catch an ordinary rabbit?
              (same way)

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              • #22
                Originally posted by mommyof4
                In Mississippi, the minimum legal age to get married without parental consent is 21.
                Sorry mommyof4, I didn't realize this.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by mommyof4 View Post
                  Legal age of consent is not the same as age of majority. You must be 18 to move out of your parents' home. California, you must be 18. Sorry I couldn't be more reassuring. Can you call a teen hotline? They can direct you to some help and it is annonymous. Try child help USA.

                  I am sorry but you are wrong hunni. In Missouri, you must be 17. I just turned 17, and I moved out 3 days later. But, you have to go to get a Affit - David, to prove that you are stable. I live with my fiance's family. I am still in school. I enrolled in school by myself. I live in Springfeild MO. How about you hunni?
                  Cheryl

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by cherylsnlove17 View Post
                    I am sorry but you are wrong hunni. In Missouri, you must be 17. I just turned 17, and I moved out 3 days later. But, you have to go to get a Affit - David, to prove that you are stable. I live with my fiance's family. I am still in school. I enrolled in school by myself. I live in Springfeild MO. How about you hunni?
                    Cheryl

                    At the age of 17, you can be prosecuted as an adult, but you are not "allowed" to move out or enrole in school by yourself. A child or minor cannot sign or enter into a legal contract/document. School enrollment is a legal document. I know Springfield schools, and you cannot be telling the truth. You are also seriously confused as to your legal terms.


                    An affidavit is a formal sworn statement of fact, signed by the declarant (who is called the affiant) and witnessed (as to the veracity of the affiant's signature) by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public. The name is Medieval Latin for he has declared upon oath.

                    One use of affidavits is to allow evidence to be gathered from witnesses or participants that may not be available to testify in person before the court.



                    Missouri Age of Majority LawAs used in sections 211.442 to 211.487, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise, the following terms mean:

                    (1) "Child", an individual under eighteen years of age;

                    http://lawdigest.uslegalforms.com/mi...x.php?dID=6374

                    (2) "Minor", any person who has not attained the age of eighteen years;

                    (3) "Parent", a biological parent or parents of a child, as well as, the husband of a natural mother at the time the child was conceived, or a parent or parents of a child by adoption, including both the mother and the putative father of a child. The putative father of a child shall have no legal relationship unless he, prior to the entry of a decree under sections 211.442 to 211.487, has acknowledged the child as his own by affirmatively asserting his paternity.

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