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abandonment..... Missouri

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  • abandonment..... Missouri

    my daughter will be 9 in a few weeks. she has not talked to or seen her real father in at least 6 months if not more. the last contact from him was by yahoo messenger saying he will leave us alone. have not heard anymore since from him. he does not pay his 50.00 month child support, the only payments paid towards child support is when the state takes his taxes or finds other sources of money on him. i have went to the lengths of getting her a cell phone strictly for him to call and to no aveil he never called. he has had his 2 oldest girls taken from him by the state due to neglect years ago. he has my phone number which has NOT changed in over 5 years but yet he still does not try to call her. how long does a parent have to be absent from the childs life in the state of missouri before you can have their rights taken away? i don't really even care for the child support to be continued if possible. its obvious he does not want to be in her life right? please help....lost over what to do

  • #2
    Das ist in der Doktor!

    Since you asked…
    I could not any particular length of time in reference to your specific question,
    But I did find this:.

    Missouri
    Child Welfare
    Grounds for Involuntary Termination of Parental Rights
    .Circumstances That Are Grounds for Termination of Parental Rights
    Ann. Stat. § 211.447

    A petition to terminate the parental rights shall be filed when:
    The child has been in foster care for at least 15 of the most recent 22 months.
    A court has determined the child to be an abandoned infant.
    The parent has:
    Committed murder or voluntary manslaughter of another child of the parent
    Aided or abetted, attempted, conspired, or solicited to commit such a murder or voluntary manslaughter
    Committed a felony assault that resulted in serious bodily injury to the child or to another child of the parent
    The child has been abandoned.
    The parent has abused or neglected the child, based on any of the following:
    A mental condition or chemical dependency that renders the parent unable to care for the child
    A severe act or recurrent acts of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse toward the child or any child in the family, including an act of incest
    Repeated or continuous failure by the parent, although physically or financially able, to provide the child with adequate food, clothing, shelter, or education
    The child has been in out-of-home care for 1 year, and the parent has failed to comply with the terms of a case plan designed to reunify the parent with the child.
    The parent has been found guilty of a sexual offense or incest, and the victim was the child or any child in the family.
    The child was conceived and born as a result of an act of forcible rape by a biological parent.
    The parent is unfit because of a consistent pattern of committing a specific abuse, including but not limited to, domestic abuse, child abuse, or drug abuse before the child.
    The parent's parental rights to one or more other children were involuntarily terminated within the immediately preceding 3 years.


    Circumstances That Are Exceptions to Termination of Parental Rights
    Ann. Stat. § 211.447

    Even when grounds exist for termination of parental rights, the juvenile officer or the Children's Division is not required to file a petition to terminate the parental rights of the child's parent or parents if:
    The child is being cared for by a relative.
    There exists a compelling reason for determining that filing such a petition would not be in the best interests of the child, as documented in the permanency plan.
    The family of the child has not been provided the services required for making reasonable efforts to preserve the family.


    Reasonable Efforts to Preserve or Reunify Families and Achieve Permanency for Children
    What Are Reasonable Efforts
    Citation: Ann. Stat. § 211.183
    The term ''reasonable efforts'' means the exercise of reasonable diligence and care by the division to utilize all available services related to meeting the needs of the juvenile and the family.

    When Reasonable Efforts Are Required
    Citation: Ann. Stat. § 211.183
    Reasonable efforts must be made:
    To prevent or eliminate the need for the removal of the child
    After removal, to make it possible for the child to return home


    When Reasonable Efforts Are NOT Required
    Citation: Ann. Stat. § 211.183
    The division shall not be required to make reasonable efforts, but it has the discretion to make reasonable efforts if the court has determined that:
    The parent has subjected the child to severe or recurrent acts of physical, emotional, or sexual abuse, including an act of incest.
    The parent has committed murder or voluntary manslaughter of another child of the parent, or aided, abetted, or attempted such act.
    The parent has committed a felony assault that resulted in serious bodily injury to the child or to another child of the parent.
    The parent's parental rights to a sibling have been terminated involuntarily.

    Note: As a general rule, courts are reluctant to terminate parental rights
    when one parent feels that another parent is unfit. Even if one parent has
    lots of flaws, courts are hesitant to simply relieve a parent of his or her
    duties to properly raise the child and pay for the child's expenses.


    In short,
    you're going to have to come up with better reasons for terminating your Ex's parental rights other than

    she has not talked to or seen her real father in at least 6 months
    I would suggest exploring professional counseling for your daughter if she should feel in any way responsible for this lap in communication between her and her father.
    And for you as well should you be finding it difficult to deal with any hostilities towards
    the Ex. you may have and be unable to resist the temptations to bad mouth him in front of your daughter.
    Trust me, I speak from experience,
    that WILL come back and haunt you.

    Good luck

    ..___________________
    ~ God never said life would be easy,
    he just promised it would be worth it

    Comment


    • #3
      There's a question I always want to ask these parents who bring up the "abandonment" issue.

      What exactly do you want to accomplish?

      And yes, there is a reason for the question.

      Comment

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