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May I move out with/without parental consent at seventeen? Missouri

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  • May I move out with/without parental consent at seventeen? Missouri

    I am new here and I've come here to gain a absolute answer on this, so please, don't let me down!

    Here's my basic situation: My mother is very controlling of my life and likes to keep me in her tiny little bubble. She also likes to talk horribly about my father and likes to put me in the middle. I want to live with my father and his girlfriend in Pennsylvania. I've been a lot more happier with him and her family then I have been with her family in the last 17 years. I have told my father I want to move in with him so I can start my life without her control and her trying to keep me in Missouri. He has granted me permission to move in with him when I can. Am I allowed to just move in with him or do I need her consent? What is also the legal age of emancipation? Would that be the best solution? Thank you so much!

  • #2
    Emancipation means you are legally "divorced" (for want of a better term) from BOTH parents. Not just one.

    You're obviously not a candidate, so the only options would be for either Mom to agree to you living with Dad, or for your Dad to go to court and file for custody. In order for this to happen he would have to show a significant change in circumstance and frankly by the time it gets to court - given that you're 17 already - you'd likely be 18 by the time it would be decided and able to choose where you want to live of your own accord anyway.

    And everyone will have wasted a lot of time and money.

    Stick it out until you're 18.

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    • #3
      Agree that you should wait until you're 18 - it will be here before you know it.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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      • #4
        Wolfie, agreed with other posters. Best solution would be to do your best to keep the peace with your mother. If you're doing or saying anything to her that would make her think that you'd rather be with your father, her reaction may well be to do exactly what you say she's doing. Drop the subject completely with her. Truth is, you're there with her now; make the best of the situation. Your relationship with your mother is going to last a lot longer than the next few months, regardless of whether you leave home at 18 or not.

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        • #5
          It depends on whether there's a custody order and what it says. Ask your father about that. If there's shared physical custody, I believe you could go to your Dad's, but others here would know more about that than me.
          I am not an attorney, and don't play one on TV. Any information given is a description only and should be verified by your attorney.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Alice Dodd View Post
            It depends on whether there's a custody order and what it says. Ask your father about that. If there's shared physical custody, I believe you could go to your Dad's, but others here would know more about that than me.


            Even with a 50/50 timeshare, kiddo cannot change residence without Mom's say-so if she's listed as primary.

            (A 50/50 timeshare isn't likely here - there are two states involved miles apart)

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