Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Question Michigan

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Question Michigan

    I know people that have answered my earlier post have recomened me to just give up. And follow through with the adoption. Or back out and file for custody. I just want to hear other opionions...... Ok child now 3 lives with mom and soon to be step dad. (Step dad has been in his life sience he was about 2/3 months old) Mom promised us visitation even after the adoption. We sent child a birthday gift we recieved no thank you no nothing. How would you feel if your childs real father wanted to make an effort for visitation and even letting the adoption go through to the best interest of child..... Would you be affended if Girlfriend/BIO dad and 1/2 brother still wanted to visit?

  • #2
    Originally posted by mom26
    I know people that have answered my earlier post have recomened me to just give up. And follow through with the adoption. Or back out and file for custody. I just want to hear other opionions...... Ok child now 3 lives with mom and soon to be step dad. (Step dad has been in his life sience he was about 2/3 months old) Mom promised us visitation even after the adoption. We sent child a birthday gift we recieved no thank you no nothing. How would you feel if your childs real father wanted to make an effort for visitation and even letting the adoption go through to the best interest of child..... Would you be affended if Girlfriend/BIO dad and 1/2 brother still wanted to visit?
    It is really not about any of the adults being offended. It is about the confusion it will cause for the children. No, not just the 3 year old being adopted, but for your little one, too. If the child is going to be adopted, then the new family needs time and a relief from any outside pressure (do not mean that you are pressuring them. ) to become settled into their roles of father and son.
    HOOK 'EM HORNS!!!
    How do you catch a very rare rabbit?
    (unique up on him)
    How do catch an ordinary rabbit?
    (same way)

    Comment


    • #3
      The short answer... Yes

      The long answer... Yes. IMO when one gives up their child for adoption they do not have the right to ask for contact and the 'perks' as they may be. I would be highly offended... but Mommyof4 is correct, it's even worse for the children. I do not see ANY way that a biological parent (or family) that has given up rights to a child could objectively 'just visit.' They are going to want to express their opinion about this or that... this it'll be 'just' wanting to see school records, or 'just' wanting to be able to see him/him when they want. When it starts it snowballs.

      I am unsure what the problem is here. It's fairly simple... either your bf steps up the plate and becomes a father by doing all the fun stuff as well as the obligations or he lets step-dad adopt and let it go.

      Comment


      • #4
        reply

        If the child lives with mom and step dad, the real father wanted to be apart of the childs life now, do not let the adoption go through he has no parental rights after the adoption. However, the real father can fight for parental rights and if he does not visit the child he can allow the grand parents to have the child during his visitation time. The grand parents in this case has no rights to fight for anything. By law no matter what happens the parent with the child has to encourage a relationship with the absent parent even if the child does not want to go. So as a father he has visitation rights If the natual father allows the adoption to go through then his rights to see or be apart of that childs life is over.

        Comment

        The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
        Working...
        X