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  • OT Well Duh

    That's OK, Steve said the troops are all PH.D's from Highland Park, mostly
    Jewish Drs.


    Fewer Black Recruits Joining the Armed Forces

    By CHRISTOPHER COOPER Staff Reporter, The Wall Street Journal


    Released OCT 6, 2004



    (Oct. 7) - The U.S. Army's ability to attract African-American soldiers has
    plummeted recently, a trend that threatens to place further strains on a
    military already stretched by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.


    Blacks attracted to the force numbered 12,103, or 15.6% of the total enlistment
    pool, in the year ended Sept. 30, down from a peak of 16,695, or 21% of
    recruits, in fiscal 2002, statistics gathered by the Army's recruiting command
    show. The timing of the drop in the share of black recruits roughly corresponds
    with the mass movement of troops to the Middle East and the outbreak of the
    Iraq war. Figures for the Army Reserve show a similar, albeit more dramatic,
    drop -- of about 27% for the same period.

    By contrast, the percentage of white recruits has held relatively steady. White
    enlistees made up 65.2%, or 50,586, of the recruiting pool in fiscal 2004 and
    62.7%, or 49,846, of recruits in fiscal 2002.

    In each of the past four years, the Army overall has recruited about the same
    number of enlistees, and so far, it has been able to reach its goals for the
    regular service, says Brig. Gen. Michael Rochelle, head of the U.S. Army
    Recruiting Command. Gen. Rochelle says he believes he will meet the next annual
    goal of attracting 80,000 regular Army soldiers overall and 22,000 reservists,
    although privately many people both inside and outside the Pentagon are
    skeptical.

    Far from an exact science, recruiting is subject to a number of variables, and
    Army officials caution that the drop in black recruitment may not signal a
    trend. Indeed, the Army says the drop in black recruits as part of the overall
    force is a positive sign, since it wants to build an organization that roughly
    matches the demographic makeup of the nation. Black Americans accounted for 24%
    of the Army as of fiscal 2003, but make up about 13% of the U.S. population.

    "We want the Army to be representative of the overall population," says Douglas
    Smith, a spokesman for the Army's recruiting command. Even with the recent
    drops, black recruits, he says, "are still at or above their percentage in the
    overall population."

    Though the decline in black recruitment isn't unprecedented -- the Army also
    had a 15.6% black enlistment rate in fiscal 2001 -- such dips usually come when
    the economy is booming and high-school graduates have more employment options.

    The current decline comes at an awkward time for the Army, which is being
    pressed by the Pentagon to provide more combat-ready soldiers. In August, the
    Army began offering $10,000 bonuses to recruits. Yesterday, it sweetened the
    offer, tacking on a $3,000 "quick ship" bonus for recruits who are ready to
    enter immediately. Also in August, it bumped up the cash awarded for college to
    $70,000 from $50,000. Such incentives, Pentagon officials and others say, often
    appeal to potential recruits from less wealthy families. The Army has
    traditionally used cash bonuses to nudge up enlistments in peacetime.

    Some military officials and outside analysts say a sustained decline in black
    enlistment could disrupt how the Pentagon staffs its operations.

    Black recruits have historically been overrepresented in "behind-the-line"
    support roles. Indeed, Pentagon statistics from fiscal 2003 show that 67% of
    all black soldiers were in combat service or support units. At the time that
    the Iraq war began, only 16% of black soldiers were in combat arms units. This
    gravitation toward support roles reflects what some potential black enlistees
    hope to receive from a career in the Army: stable employment with good benefits
    and the ability to develop skills that can be easily transferred to the
    civilian sector. Front-line positions, such as those in the infantry, don't
    provide much in the way of marketable job skills.

    But the war in Iraq has turned such distinctions on their head. Almost from the
    outset, enemy fighters concentrated their attacks on rear-guard soldiers, and
    soldiers in support functions make up many of the more than 1,000 Americans
    that have been killed there. "There's really no front line/rear echelon any
    more," says Charlie Moskos, a Northwestern University sociologist who
    specializes in military organizations. "Obviously, the war is one major factor"
    in the sharp decline in black recruitment, he says.

    In a recent discussion with reporters, Gen. Rochelle of the Army's recruiting
    command says that while a variety of conditions have an effect on enlistment --
    such as the economy -- combat also can have a powerful influence on overall
    induction rates. "Obviously, there's a war going on and, for some of our
    prospects, that is a drawback and it will deter them," he says.

    If the trend toward a lower share of black recruits continues, however, its
    effect could be wide-ranging. Black recruits generally deviate from their white
    counterparts by re-enlisting in greater numbers after their initial tour of
    duty is over. Though unable to provide current statistics, an Army spokesman
    says that early-career black soldiers routinely re-enlist at a higher rate than
    their white counterparts. In 1998, the re-enlistment rate for black male
    specialists was 82%; the corresponding rate for white specialists was 74%. One
    of the primary benefits of a volunteer force as opposed to a draft is that
    increased incentives encourage recruits to stick with the Army and make it a
    career.

    Northwestern's Mr. Moskos says one of the main reasons that black recruits
    stick with the Army is the perception that African-Americans have of it as a
    relatively color-blind institution that allows minorities opportunities for
    advancement. Rare is the American institution, Mr. Moskos says, "where whites
    are routinely bossed around by blacks."

    Some say, however, that the perception of the Army as an egalitarian
    institution may be eroding, again because of the Iraq war. David Segal, a
    University of Maryland sociology professor, says two recent events connected to
    the war may have resonated among potential black recruits in a way that wasn't
    reflected among white enlistees.

    The first was a recent bill submitted by Rep. Charles Rangel, a black
    congressman from New York, which called for a resumption of a universal
    military draft. Though the bill was killed this week by Congress, it drew
    extensive attention, as did Mr. Rangel's justification for submitting it. Mr.
    Rangel says he wanted a draft, in part, because he wanted to ensure that the
    offspring of wealthy citizens shared equally in the burden of war. And though
    Mr. Rangel couched his argument in terms of class, many black Americans equated
    it to race, Mr. Segal says.

    A second event occurred at the beginning of the Iraq war, when Pvt. Jessica
    Lynch, a white female soldier in an Army maintenance company, was taken hostage
    by marauding Iraqis. The story of Pvt. Lynch and her eventual rescue by
    special-forces soldiers was extensively chronicled by the Pentagon and the U.S.
    media.

    Less noticed was the story of Spc. Shoshona Johnson, a black woman, who was in
    the same maintenance unit as Pvt. Lynch and was also taken hostage and later
    rescued. Her story got far less attention, and Mr. Segal says he has heard
    anecdotally that this has fostered resentment in the black community.

    Whether the Pentagon was fair in its treatment of the two women is beside the
    point, Mr. Segal says; the perception is all that matters. "The Department of
    Defense needed a hero, and it was nice to have one who was pretty and blond,"
    he says. "I've heard a great deal about that."















  • #2
    OT Well Duh

    I happily admit that I missed the point in either your intro or your decision
    to post this particular article, Marcy.

    If it was that blacks are disproportionately represented in the military, I'd
    guess most of us knew that. I'm pleased, and pleasantly surprised, to learn
    that blacks do not appear to be over-represented in front line troops.

    J.


    That's OK, Steve said the troops are all PH.D's from Highland Park, mostlyJewish Drs.Fewer Black Recruits Joining the Armed ForcesBy CHRISTOPHER COOPER Staff Reporter, The Wall Street JournalReleased OCT 6, 2004(Oct. 7) - The U.S. Army's ability to attract African-American soldiers hasplummeted recently, a trend that threatens to place further strains on amilitary already stretched by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.Blacks attracted to the force numbered 12,103, or 15.6% of the totalenlistmentpool, in the year ended Sept. 30, down from a peak of 16,695, or 21% ofrecruits, in fiscal 2002, statistics gathered by the Army's recruitingcommandshow. The timing of the drop in the share of black recruits roughlycorrespondswith the mass movement of troops to the Middle East and the outbreak of theIraq war. Figures for the Army Reserve show a similar, albeit more dramatic,drop -- of about 27% for the same period.By contrast, the percentage of white recruits has held relatively steady.Whiteenlistees made up 65.2%, or 50,586, of the recruiting pool in fiscal 2004 and62.7%, or 49,846, of recruits in fiscal 2002.In each of the past four years, the Army overall has recruited about the samenumber of enlistees, and so far, it has been able to reach its goals for theregular service, says Brig. Gen. Michael Rochelle, head of the U.S. ArmyRecruiting Command. Gen. Rochelle says he believes he will meet the nextannualgoal of attracting 80,000 regular Army soldiers overall and 22,000reservists,although privately many people both inside and outside the Pentagon areskeptical.Far from an exact science, recruiting is subject to a number of variables,andArmy officials caution that the drop in black recruitment may not signal atrend. Indeed, the Army says the drop in black recruits as part of theoverallforce is a positive sign, since it wants to build an organization thatroughlymatches the demographic makeup of the nation. Black Americans accounted for24%of the Army as of fiscal 2003, but make up about 13% of the U.S. population."We want the Army to be representative of the overall population," saysDouglasSmith, a spokesman for the Army's recruiting command. Even with the recentdrops, black recruits, he says, "are still at or above their percentage intheoverall population."Though the decline in black recruitment isn't unprecedented -- the Army alsohad a 15.6% black enlistment rate in fiscal 2001 -- such dips usually comewhenthe economy is booming and high-school graduates have more employmentoptions.The current decline comes at an awkward time for the Army, which is beingpressed by the Pentagon to provide more combat-ready soldiers. In August, theArmy began offering $10,000 bonuses to recruits. Yesterday, it sweetened theoffer, tacking on a $3,000 "quick ship" bonus for recruits who are ready toenter immediately. Also in August, it bumped up the cash awarded for collegeto$70,000 from $50,000. Such incentives, Pentagon officials and others say,oftenappeal to potential recruits from less wealthy families. The Army hastraditionally used cash bonuses to nudge up enlistments in peacetime.Some military officials and outside analysts say a sustained decline in blackenlistment could disrupt how the Pentagon staffs its operations.Black recruits have historically been overrepresented in "behind-the-line"support roles. Indeed, Pentagon statistics from fiscal 2003 show that 67% ofall black soldiers were in combat service or support units. At the time thatthe Iraq war began, only 16% of black soldiers were in combat arms units.Thisgravitation toward support roles reflects what some potential black enlisteeshope to receive from a career in the Army: stable employment with goodbenefitsand the ability to develop skills that can be easily transferred to thecivilian sector. Front-line positions, such as those in the infantry, don'tprovide much in the way of marketable job skills.But the war in Iraq has turned such distinctions on their head. Almost fromtheoutset, enemy fighters concentrated their attacks on rear-guard soldiers, andsoldiers in support functions make up many of the more than 1,000 Americansthat have been killed there. "There's really no front line/rear echelon anymore," says Charlie Moskos, a Northwestern University sociologist whospecializes in military organizations. "Obviously, the war is one majorfactor"in the sharp decline in black recruitment, he says.In a recent discussion with reporters, Gen. Rochelle of the Army's recruitingcommand says that while a variety of conditions have an effect on enlistment--such as the economy -- combat also can have a powerful influence on overallinduction rates. "Obviously, there's a war going on and, for some of ourprospects, that is a drawback and it will deter them," he says.If the trend toward a lower share of black recruits continues, however, itseffect could be wide-ranging. Black recruits generally deviate from theirwhitecounterparts by re-enlisting in greater numbers after their initial tour ofduty is over. Though unable to provide current statistics, an Army spokesmansays that early-career black soldiers routinely re-enlist at a higher ratethantheir white counterparts. In 1998, the re-enlistment rate for black malespecialists was 82%; the corresponding rate for white specialists was 74%.Oneof the primary benefits of a volunteer force as opposed to a draft is thatincreased incentives encourage recruits to stick with the Army and make it acareer.Northwestern's Mr. Moskos says one of the main reasons that black recruitsstick with the Army is the perception that African-Americans have of it as arelatively color-blind institution that allows minorities opportunities foradvancement. Rare is the American institution, Mr. Moskos says, "where whitesare routinely bossed around by blacks."Some say, however, that the perception of the Army as an egalitarianinstitution may be eroding, again because of the Iraq war. David Segal, aUniversity of Maryland sociology professor, says two recent events connectedtothe war may have resonated among potential black recruits in a way thatwasn'treflected among white enlistees.The first was a recent bill submitted by Rep. Charles Rangel, a blackcongressman from New York, which called for a resumption of a universalmilitary draft. Though the bill was killed this week by Congress, it drewextensive attention, as did Mr. Rangel's justification for submitting it. Mr.Rangel says he wanted a draft, in part, because he wanted to ensure that theoffspring of wealthy citizens shared equally in the burden of war. And thoughMr. Rangel couched his argument in terms of class, many black Americansequatedit to race, Mr. Segal says.A second event occurred at the beginning of the Iraq war, when Pvt. JessicaLynch, a white female soldier in an Army maintenance company, was takenhostageby marauding Iraqis. The story of Pvt. Lynch and her eventual rescue byspecial-forces soldiers was extensively chronicled by the Pentagon and theU.S.media.Less noticed was the story of Spc. Shoshona Johnson, a black woman, who wasinthe same maintenance unit as Pvt. Lynch and was also taken hostage and laterrescued. Her story got far less attention, and Mr. Segal says he has heardanecdotally that this has fostered resentment in the black community.Whether the Pentagon was fair in its treatment of the two women is beside thepoint, Mr. Segal says; the perception is all that matters. "The Department ofDefense needed a hero, and it was nice to have one who was pretty and blond,"he says. "I've heard a great deal about that."



    Reply to jmhjmd at aol.


    Comment


    • #3
      OT Well Duh

      >From: [email protected]ostible (J.)
      Date: 10/7/2004 1:35 PM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>I happily admit that I missed the point in either your intro or your decisionto post this partic
      I posted Michael Moore's assertion that young poor kids go into the military
      because of rampant joblessness, and that the military does heavy recruiting in
      rural, poor areas. Steve countered with most in the military are highly
      educated and come from wealthy families. The West Point crowd. Balderdash. The
      military preys on people with few alternatives. I want to see the Bush twins on
      the front lines of Iraq. Maybe I will pitch in for their flak jackets or the
      armor for their Humvees.

      Comment


      • #4
        OT Well Duh

        In article <[email protected]>,
        [email protected] (Chosenchildinc1) wrote:
        From: [email protected]ostible (J.)Date: 10/7/2004 1:35 PM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>I happily admit that I missed the point in either your intro or yourdecision to post this partic I posted Michael Moore's assertion that young poor kids go into the military because of rampant joblessness, and that the military does heavy recruiting in rural, poor areas. Steve countered with most in the military are highly educated and come from wealthy families. The West Point crowd. Balderdash. The military preys on people with few alternatives. I want to see the Bush twins on the front lines of Iraq. Maybe I will pitch in for their flak jackets or the armor for their Humvees.


        99% of commissioned officers have college degrees. Many have advanced
        degrees.

        Over half of non-commissioned officers (Sgt. 1st Class and above) have
        college degrees.

        Both are far-higher percentages than one will find in the public at
        large.

        Many officers, special forces personnel and non-coms speak a second
        language -- again, far higher than the general population.

        The military places a huge premium on education -- the demands of the
        job, from infantry to support, require an educated soldier. It's one of
        the key reasons why our military is so good.

        The number one reason why young people enlist is known. It's been
        examined in polls. It's known.

        That reason -- patriotism.

        A concept that appears to be unknown to you.

        Other reasons are important -- a chance to get an education, to learn
        skills that will be useful later in life. A chance to see the world. A
        chance to see what you're made of. Perhaps better prospects in the
        military than elsewhere.

        All honorable reasons.

        What is dishonorable is your continued denigration of these young men
        and women.

        You are, simply, a dishonorable person.




        steve

        Comment


        • #5
          OT Well Duh

          Screw you, Marcy. No one should join the forces if they don't want to.
          That's "a good thing".

          Deanna

          "Chosenchildinc1" <[email protected]> wrote in message
          news:[email protected]
          That's OK, Steve said the troops are all PH.D's from Highland Park, mostly Jewish Drs. Fewer Black Recruits Joining the Armed Forces By CHRISTOPHER COOPER Staff Reporter, The Wall Street Journal Released OCT 6, 2004 (Oct. 7) - The U.S. Army's ability to attract African-American soldiers
          has
          plummeted recently, a trend that threatens to place further strains on a military already stretched by wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Blacks attracted to the force numbered 12,103, or 15.6% of the total
          enlistment
          pool, in the year ended Sept. 30, down from a peak of 16,695, or 21% of recruits, in fiscal 2002, statistics gathered by the Army's recruiting
          command
          show. The timing of the drop in the share of black recruits roughly
          corresponds
          with the mass movement of troops to the Middle East and the outbreak of
          the
          Iraq war. Figures for the Army Reserve show a similar, albeit more
          dramatic,
          drop -- of about 27% for the same period. By contrast, the percentage of white recruits has held relatively steady.
          White
          enlistees made up 65.2%, or 50,586, of the recruiting pool in fiscal 2004
          and
          62.7%, or 49,846, of recruits in fiscal 2002. In each of the past four years, the Army overall has recruited about the
          same
          number of enlistees, and so far, it has been able to reach its goals for
          the
          regular service, says Brig. Gen. Michael Rochelle, head of the U.S. Army Recruiting Command. Gen. Rochelle says he believes he will meet the next
          annual
          goal of attracting 80,000 regular Army soldiers overall and 22,000
          reservists,
          although privately many people both inside and outside the Pentagon are skeptical. Far from an exact science, recruiting is subject to a number of variables,
          and
          Army officials caution that the drop in black recruitment may not signal a trend. Indeed, the Army says the drop in black recruits as part of the
          overall
          force is a positive sign, since it wants to build an organization that
          roughly
          matches the demographic makeup of the nation. Black Americans accounted
          for 24%
          of the Army as of fiscal 2003, but make up about 13% of the U.S.
          population.
          "We want the Army to be representative of the overall population," says
          Douglas
          Smith, a spokesman for the Army's recruiting command. Even with the recent drops, black recruits, he says, "are still at or above their percentage in
          the
          overall population." Though the decline in black recruitment isn't unprecedented -- the Army
          also
          had a 15.6% black enlistment rate in fiscal 2001 -- such dips usually come
          when
          the economy is booming and high-school graduates have more employment
          options.
          The current decline comes at an awkward time for the Army, which is being pressed by the Pentagon to provide more combat-ready soldiers. In August,
          the
          Army began offering $10,000 bonuses to recruits. Yesterday, it sweetened
          the
          offer, tacking on a $3,000 "quick ship" bonus for recruits who are ready
          to
          enter immediately. Also in August, it bumped up the cash awarded for
          college to
          $70,000 from $50,000. Such incentives, Pentagon officials and others say,
          often
          appeal to potential recruits from less wealthy families. The Army has traditionally used cash bonuses to nudge up enlistments in peacetime. Some military officials and outside analysts say a sustained decline in
          black
          enlistment could disrupt how the Pentagon staffs its operations. Black recruits have historically been overrepresented in "behind-the-line" support roles. Indeed, Pentagon statistics from fiscal 2003 show that 67%
          of
          all black soldiers were in combat service or support units. At the time
          that
          the Iraq war began, only 16% of black soldiers were in combat arms units.
          This
          gravitation toward support roles reflects what some potential black
          enlistees
          hope to receive from a career in the Army: stable employment with good
          benefits
          and the ability to develop skills that can be easily transferred to the civilian sector. Front-line positions, such as those in the infantry,
          don't
          provide much in the way of marketable job skills. But the war in Iraq has turned such distinctions on their head. Almost
          from the
          outset, enemy fighters concentrated their attacks on rear-guard soldiers,
          and
          soldiers in support functions make up many of the more than 1,000
          Americans
          that have been killed there. "There's really no front line/rear echelon
          any
          more," says Charlie Moskos, a Northwestern University sociologist who specializes in military organizations. "Obviously, the war is one major
          factor"
          in the sharp decline in black recruitment, he says. In a recent discussion with reporters, Gen. Rochelle of the Army's
          recruiting
          command says that while a variety of conditions have an effect on
          enlistment --
          such as the economy -- combat also can have a powerful influence on
          overall
          induction rates. "Obviously, there's a war going on and, for some of our prospects, that is a drawback and it will deter them," he says. If the trend toward a lower share of black recruits continues, however,
          its
          effect could be wide-ranging. Black recruits generally deviate from their
          white
          counterparts by re-enlisting in greater numbers after their initial tour
          of
          duty is over. Though unable to provide current statistics, an Army
          spokesman
          says that early-career black soldiers routinely re-enlist at a higher rate
          than
          their white counterparts. In 1998, the re-enlistment rate for black male specialists was 82%; the corresponding rate for white specialists was 74%.
          One
          of the primary benefits of a volunteer force as opposed to a draft is that increased incentives encourage recruits to stick with the Army and make it
          a
          career. Northwestern's Mr. Moskos says one of the main reasons that black recruits stick with the Army is the perception that African-Americans have of it as
          a
          relatively color-blind institution that allows minorities opportunities
          for
          advancement. Rare is the American institution, Mr. Moskos says, "where
          whites
          are routinely bossed around by blacks." Some say, however, that the perception of the Army as an egalitarian institution may be eroding, again because of the Iraq war. David Segal, a University of Maryland sociology professor, says two recent events
          connected to
          the war may have resonated among potential black recruits in a way that
          wasn't
          reflected among white enlistees. The first was a recent bill submitted by Rep. Charles Rangel, a black congressman from New York, which called for a resumption of a universal military draft. Though the bill was killed this week by Congress, it drew extensive attention, as did Mr. Rangel's justification for submitting it.
          Mr.
          Rangel says he wanted a draft, in part, because he wanted to ensure that
          the
          offspring of wealthy citizens shared equally in the burden of war. And
          though
          Mr. Rangel couched his argument in terms of class, many black Americans
          equated
          it to race, Mr. Segal says. A second event occurred at the beginning of the Iraq war, when Pvt.
          Jessica
          Lynch, a white female soldier in an Army maintenance company, was taken
          hostage
          by marauding Iraqis. The story of Pvt. Lynch and her eventual rescue by special-forces soldiers was extensively chronicled by the Pentagon and the
          U.S.
          media. Less noticed was the story of Spc. Shoshona Johnson, a black woman, who
          was in
          the same maintenance unit as Pvt. Lynch and was also taken hostage and
          later
          rescued. Her story got far less attention, and Mr. Segal says he has heard anecdotally that this has fostered resentment in the black community. Whether the Pentagon was fair in its treatment of the two women is beside
          the
          point, Mr. Segal says; the perception is all that matters. "The Department
          of
          Defense needed a hero, and it was nice to have one who was pretty and
          blond,"
          he says. "I've heard a great deal about that."

          ---
          Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
          Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
          Version: 6.0.771 / Virus Database: 518 - Release Date: 9/28/04


          Comment


          • #6
            OT Well Duh

            If so, I can't think of a better reason to drop out of high school.

            Marley

            Tune in, turn on, drop out




            "Steve White" <[email protected]> wrote in message
            news:[email protected]
            In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] (Chosenchildinc1) wrote:
            From: [email protected]ostible (J.)Date: 10/7/2004 1:35 PM Eastern Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>I happily admit that I missed the point in either your intro or yourdecision to post this partic I posted Michael Moore's assertion that young poor kids go into the military because of rampant joblessness, and that the military does heavy recruiting in rural, poor areas. Steve countered with most in the military are highly educated and come from wealthy families. The West Point crowd. Balderdash. The military preys on people with few alternatives. I want to see the Bush twins on the front lines of Iraq. Maybe I will pitch in for their flak jackets or the armor for their Humvees.
            99% of commissioned officers have college degrees. Many have advanced degrees. Over half of non-commissioned officers (Sgt. 1st Class and above) have college degrees. Both are far-higher percentages than one will find in the public at large. Many officers, special forces personnel and non-coms speak a second language -- again, far higher than the general population. The military places a huge premium on education -- the demands of the job, from infantry to support, require an educated soldier. It's one of the key reasons why our military is so good. The number one reason why young people enlist is known. It's been examined in polls. It's known. That reason -- patriotism. A concept that appears to be unknown to you. Other reasons are important -- a chance to get an education, to learn skills that will be useful later in life. A chance to see the world. A chance to see what you're made of. Perhaps better prospects in the military than elsewhere. All honorable reasons. What is dishonorable is your continued denigration of these young men and women. You are, simply, a dishonorable person. steve

            Comment

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