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For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

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  • #46
    For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

    Amy D wrote:
    "Bill in Co." wrote:
    Amy D wrote:
    JWB wrote:>> "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message> news:[email protected]>>>>>> JWB wrote:>>>> Does your husband speed in his truck?>>>> No, he's an independent contractor so any fuel lost by speeding is>> money lost. He also freezes his *** of rather than idling all night>> to conserve fuel.>> If he doesn't speed, he'd be the first trucker I ever saw that did> not. But I will take your word for it. Rookie and company driver stuff -- he sped in his young days...ran illegal logs...the works....now that he pays the fuel and he has more to support than logbook tickets pretty much makes him run straight and narrow.>>>>> I think you did mention "drunk truckdrivers" in your original>> definition but maybe it was someone else.>> Not I>>>>> I don't think it's 60/40% but it's probably increasing as more>> independent drivers get out and more big corporation <equivilant to>> "sweatshops" in the walmart discussion> company drivers come in. The>> big corporations recruit drivers out of areas where people are>> looking for an "honest living" rather than selling crack......I know>> the difference between the two just by looking at the truck and>> naturally stay away from them on the road <at my husband's request>.>> Even though they aren't all cracktown recruits ALOT are>> inexperienced.....big companies tend to toss two rookies together in>> the truck hoping four eyes are better than two.....and also own>> their own insurance companies.>>>> But it's still not as BAD as portrayed.....the odds of being killed>> by the other car, hummer, SUV are MUCH HIGHER.>> I agree. But in a collision, the odds are higher of dying if you> collide with a truck. So we're about on the same page now. Always love talking shop with ya, JWB. amy
    We ought to rename this the truck driving and responsibility thread!
    Actually, I doubt JWB realizes how totally beneficial these conversations are to my marriage. Once or twice a year my husband <understandably> hits driver burn-out. At these times it is my responsibility to be the voice of reason even if I am mired as deep in the muck of the trucking industry as he is at the time. JWB always has a way of helping me pull myself into the "big picture" so I can be objective to counteract his burnout. Kind of like it's my husband's job to be the voice of reason when I'm totally wrapped up in utter parenting chaos. He is able to provide the "outside" view. amy
    OK - sounds like a good perspective. I wasn't exactly sure what you meant by
    his "driver burn out", but I presume that means he gets fed up with some of the
    bull**** he has to put up with in it, and/or he feels he's tired of doing it
    for a living (at least on some days).


    Comment


    • #47
      For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

      "Bill in Co." wrote:
      Amy D wrote:
      "Bill in Co." wrote:
      Amy D wrote:> JWB wrote:>>>> "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message>> news:[email protected]>>>>>>>>> JWB wrote:>>>>>> Does your husband speed in his truck?>>>>>> No, he's an independent contractor so any fuel lost by speeding is>>> money lost. He also freezes his *** of rather than idling all night>>> to conserve fuel.>>>> If he doesn't speed, he'd be the first trucker I ever saw that did>> not. But I will take your word for it.>> Rookie and company driver stuff -- he sped in his young days...ran> illegal logs...the works....now that he pays the fuel and he has more> to support than logbook tickets pretty much makes him run straight and> narrow.>>>>>>>>> I think you did mention "drunk truckdrivers" in your original>>> definition but maybe it was someone else.>>>> Not I>>>>>>>> I don't think it's 60/40% but it's probably increasing as more>>> independent drivers get out and more big corporation <equivilant to>>> "sweatshops" in the walmart discussion> company drivers come in. The>>> big corporations recruit drivers out of areas where people are>>> looking for an "honest living" rather than selling crack......I know>>> the difference between the two just by looking at the truck and>>> naturally stay away from them on the road <at my husband's request>.>>> Even though they aren't all cracktown recruits ALOT are>>> inexperienced.....big companies tend to toss two rookies together in>>> the truck hoping four eyes are better than two.....and also own>>> their own insurance companies.>>>>>> But it's still not as BAD as portrayed.....the odds of being killed>>> by the other car, hummer, SUV are MUCH HIGHER.>>>> I agree. But in a collision, the odds are higher of dying if you>> collide with a truck.>> So we're about on the same page now. Always love talking shop with> ya, JWB. >> amy We ought to rename this the truck driving and responsibility thread!
      Actually, I doubt JWB realizes how totally beneficial these conversations are to my marriage. Once or twice a year my husband <understandably> hits driver burn-out. At these times it is my responsibility to be the voice of reason even if I am mired as deep in the muck of the trucking industry as he is at the time. JWB always has a way of helping me pull myself into the "big picture" so I can be objective to counteract his burnout. Kind of like it's my husband's job to be the voice of reason when I'm totally wrapped up in utter parenting chaos. He is able to provide the "outside" view. amy
      OK - sounds like a good perspective. I wasn't exactly sure what you meant by his "driver burn out", but I presume that means he gets fed up with some of the bull**** he has to put up with in it, and/or he feels he's tired of doing it for a living (at least on some days).
      Actually, this burnout is a little different I think so it is sending up
      some red flags. Normal burnout for him is he needs to take a week-10
      days off rather than "stop through the house for a couple days every six
      weeks".

      This one in particular I think was brought on by "the baby". The baby
      never really cared one way or another if he was here or not since he has
      been running this gig since he was born. It's been really hard on our
      older child who has spent alot of time with him. But the baby always
      thought he was cool since we usually had chocolate birthday cake or
      celebrated a holiday when he showed up but he was no big deal. NOW,
      they are developing a bond and I think it's going to make him crack.

      Normal signs of burnout?

      Money arguments.....I often miss this sign and don't de-personalize it.


      But I usually figure it out once we are ready to "divorce". LOL

      THIS time I'm seeing bigger signs....normally he's a "star driver" and
      "contractor of the month"......he hasn't been late for an appointment
      yet but he's having a really hard time keeping the truck moving down the
      road.

      He's talking increasing life insurance. <I know that sounds really
      dramamtic but he'll do that occassionally in "normal burnout"--his way
      of communicating "I can't provide for you....">.

      He dropped an empty trailer on the ground because the kingpin didn't
      latch. And he didn't even see that as a sign......

      And the not so subtle sign, "I need to do something but I don't know
      what!"

      I'm actually surrounded by a good support system in this life but it
      seems at my moments of "bucking up and pulling myself together" to be
      the objective one JWB always manages to snap me out of it the fastest.
      Not that he ever changes my mind on my beliefs about trucking but
      somehow he makes an excellent sounding board so I can draw out what I
      need to right now. It does always seem that as soon as I have to snap
      out of it some dumb truckdriver does something incredibly stupid like
      fumbling for a cellphone and killing a kindergartener about to get on a
      bus which floods the trucking newsgroup with all the radical
      truck-haters and I find myself defending an industry that is causing
      upheaval in my life. And in my other support circles I'm stuck in the
      middle. I have a group of mentors and even my own batch of
      trainees...but I've been around long enough that the "mentor group" kind
      of brushes it off as "I know how to handle this" and my trainee circle
      is still in the honeymoon phase so I have to sugar coat it a
      little....anyway, JWB always manages to help me pull it all together.
      So sorry ya'll for boring you!

      amy

      Comment


      • #48
        For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

        JWB wrote:
        "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
        "Bill in Co." wrote:
        Amy D wrote: > JWB wrote: >> >> "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message >> news:[email protected] >>> >>> >>> JWB wrote: >> >>>> Does your husband speed in his truck? >>> >>> No, he's an independent contractor so any fuel lost by speeding is
        money
        >>> lost. He also freezes his *** of rather than idling all night to >>> conserve fuel. >> >> If he doesn't speed, he'd be the first trucker I ever saw that did
        not. But
        >> I will take your word for it. > > Rookie and company driver stuff -- he sped in his young days...ran > illegal logs...the works....now that he pays the fuel and he has more
        to
        > support than logbook tickets pretty much makes him run straight and > narrow. > >> >>> >>> I think you did mention "drunk truckdrivers" in your original
        definition
        >>> but maybe it was someone else. >> >> Not I >> >>> >>> I don't think it's 60/40% but it's probably increasing as more >>> independent drivers get out and more big corporation <equivilant to >>> "sweatshops" in the walmart discussion> company drivers come in.
        The
        >>> big corporations recruit drivers out of areas where people are
        looking
        >>> for an "honest living" rather than selling crack......I know the >>> difference between the two just by looking at the truck and
        naturally
        >>> stay away from them on the road <at my husband's request>. Even
        though
        >>> they aren't all cracktown recruits ALOT are inexperienced.....big >>> companies tend to toss two rookies together in the truck hoping four >>> eyes are better than two.....and also own their own insurance
        companies.
        >>> >>> But it's still not as BAD as portrayed.....the odds of being killed
        by
        >>> the other car, hummer, SUV are MUCH HIGHER. >> >> I agree. But in a collision, the odds are higher of dying if you
        collide
        >> with a truck. > > So we're about on the same page now. Always love talking shop with > ya, JWB. > > amy We ought to rename this the truck driving and responsibility thread! Actually, I doubt JWB realizes how totally beneficial these conversations are to my marriage. Once or twice a year my husband <understandably> hits driver burn-out. At these times it is my responsibility to be the voice of reason even if I am mired as deep in the muck of the trucking industry as he is at the time. JWB always has a way of helping me pull myself into the "big picture" so I can be objective to counteract his burnout. Kind of like it's my husband's job to be the voice of reason when I'm totally wrapped up in utter parenting chaos. He is able to provide the "outside" view.
        Geez, that's nice to hear. I do like talking the truck thing, because it was an interesting time in my life.
        LOL--I can't explain it. I remember the first time we talked truck I
        literally hated you. Although I was pretty miserable in my life.

        But it's like a barometer to me -- once I lose that "you are looking
        down your nose" feeling I described I know I'm on top of my game. And
        it doesn't work with just anyone -- sometimes when I lose that feeling
        I'm just downright defensive, bitter, and terminally unique. It
        would never work if I just posted a thread saying "JWB, I need to talk
        truck" though -- it has to catch me off guard and it always happens at
        the right moment. SO I guess everyone is just going to have to suffer
        through it once or twice a year.

        amy

        Comment


        • #49
          For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

          Amy D wrote:
          "Bill in Co." wrote:
          Amy D wrote:
          "Bill in Co." wrote:>> Amy D wrote:>> JWB wrote:>>>>>> "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message>>> news:[email protected]>>>>>>>>>>>> JWB wrote:>>>>>>>> Does your husband speed in his truck?>>>>>>>> No, he's an independent contractor so any fuel lost by speeding>>>> is money lost. He also freezes his *** of rather than idling>>>> all night to conserve fuel.>>>>>> If he doesn't speed, he'd be the first trucker I ever saw that did>>> not. But I will take your word for it.>>>> Rookie and company driver stuff -- he sped in his young days...ran>> illegal logs...the works....now that he pays the fuel and he has>> more to support than logbook tickets pretty much makes him run>> straight and narrow.>>>>>>>>>>>>> I think you did mention "drunk truckdrivers" in your original>>>> definition but maybe it was someone else.>>>>>> Not I>>>>>>>>>>> I don't think it's 60/40% but it's probably increasing as more>>>> independent drivers get out and more big corporation <equivilant>>>> to "sweatshops" in the walmart discussion> company drivers come>>>> in. The big corporations recruit drivers out of areas where>>>> people are looking for an "honest living" rather than selling>>>> crack......I know the difference between the two just by looking>>>> at the truck and naturally stay away from them on the road <at>>>> my husband's request>. Even though they aren't all cracktown>>>> recruits ALOT are inexperienced.....big companies tend to toss>>>> two rookies together in the truck hoping four eyes are better>>>> than two.....and also own their own insurance companies.>>>>>>>> But it's still not as BAD as portrayed.....the odds of being>>>> killed by the other car, hummer, SUV are MUCH HIGHER.>>>>>> I agree. But in a collision, the odds are higher of dying if you>>> collide with a truck.>>>> So we're about on the same page now. Always love talking shop>> with ya, JWB. >>>> amy>> We ought to rename this the truck driving and responsibility thread! Actually, I doubt JWB realizes how totally beneficial these conversations are to my marriage. Once or twice a year my husband <understandably> hits driver burn-out. At these times it is my responsibility to be the voice of reason even if I am mired as deep in the muck of the trucking industry as he is at the time. JWB always has a way of helping me pull myself into the "big picture" so I can be objective to counteract his burnout. Kind of like it's my husband's job to be the voice of reason when I'm totally wrapped up in utter parenting chaos. He is able to provide the "outside" view. amy
          OK - sounds like a good perspective. I wasn't exactly sure what you meant by his "driver burn out", but I presume that means he gets fed up with some of the bull**** he has to put up with in it, and/or he feels he's tired of doing it for a living (at least on some days).
          Actually, this burnout is a little different I think so it is sending up some red flags. Normal burnout for him is he needs to take a week-10 days off rather than "stop through the house for a couple days every six weeks". This one in particular I think was brought on by "the baby". The baby never really cared one way or another if he was here or not since he has been running this gig since he was born. It's been really hard on our older child who has spent alot of time with him. But the baby always thought he was cool since we usually had chocolate birthday cake or celebrated a holiday when he showed up but he was no big deal. NOW, they are developing a bond and I think it's going to make him crack. Normal signs of burnout? Money arguments.....I often miss this sign and don't de-personalize it. But I usually figure it out once we are ready to "divorce". LOL THIS time I'm seeing bigger signs....normally he's a "star driver" and "contractor of the month"......he hasn't been late for an appointment yet but he's having a really hard time keeping the truck moving down the road. He's talking increasing life insurance. <I know that sounds really dramamtic but he'll do that occassionally in "normal burnout"--his way of communicating "I can't provide for you....">. He dropped an empty trailer on the ground because the kingpin didn't latch. And he didn't even see that as a sign...... And the not so subtle sign, "I need to do something but I don't know what!" I'm actually surrounded by a good support system in this life but it seems at my moments of "bucking up and pulling myself together" to be the objective one JWB always manages to snap me out of it the fastest. Not that he ever changes my mind on my beliefs about trucking but somehow he makes an excellent sounding board so I can draw out what I need to right now. It does always seem that as soon as I have to snap out of it some dumb truckdriver does something incredibly stupid like fumbling for a cellphone and killing a kindergartener about to get on a bus which floods the trucking newsgroup with all the radical truck-haters and I find myself defending an industry that is causing upheaval in my life. And in my other support circles I'm stuck in the middle. I have a group of mentors and even my own batch of trainees...but I've been around long enough that the "mentor group" kind of brushes it off as "I know how to handle this" and my trainee circle is still in the honeymoon phase so I have to sugar coat it a little....anyway, JWB always manages to help me pull it all together. So sorry ya'll for boring you! amy
          Not in the least. It was interesting to hear about it, Amy.


          Comment


          • #50
            For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

            "Bill in Co." <[email protected]> wrote in message
            news:[email protected] ink.net...
            Amy D wrote:
            "Bill in Co." wrote:
            Amy D wrote:> "Bill in Co." wrote:>>>> Amy D wrote:>>> JWB wrote:>>>>>>>> "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message>>>> news:[email protected]>>>>>>>>>>>>> >> JWB wrote:>>>>>>>>>> Does your husband speed in his truck?>>>>>>>>>> No, he's an independent contractor so any fuel lost by speeding>>>>> is money lost. He also freezes his *** of rather than idling>>>>> all night to conserve fuel.>>>>>>>> If he doesn't speed, he'd be the first trucker I ever saw that did>>>> not. But I will take your word for it.>>>>>> Rookie and company driver stuff -- he sped in his young days...ran>>> illegal logs...the works....now that he pays the fuel and he has>>> more to support than logbook tickets pretty much makes him run>>> straight and narrow.>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> I think you did mention "drunk truckdrivers" in your original>>>>> definition but maybe it was someone else.>>>>>>>> Not I>>>>>>>>>>>>>> I don't think it's 60/40% but it's probably increasing as more>>>>> independent drivers get out and more big corporation <equivilant>>>>> to "sweatshops" in the walmart discussion> company drivers come>>>>> in. The big corporations recruit drivers out of areas where>>>>> people are looking for an "honest living" rather than selling>>>>> crack......I know the difference between the two just by looking>>>>> at the truck and naturally stay away from them on the road <at>>>>> my husband's request>. Even though they aren't all cracktown>>>>> recruits ALOT are inexperienced.....big companies tend to toss>>>>> two rookies together in the truck hoping four eyes are better>>>>> than two.....and also own their own insurance companies.>>>>>>>>>> But it's still not as BAD as portrayed.....the odds of being>>>>> killed by the other car, hummer, SUV are MUCH HIGHER.>>>>>>>> I agree. But in a collision, the odds are higher of dying if you>>>> collide with a truck.>>>>>> So we're about on the same page now. Always love talking shop>>> with ya, JWB. >>>>>> amy>>>> We ought to rename this the truck driving and responsibility thread!>> Actually, I doubt JWB realizes how totally beneficial these> conversations are to my marriage. Once or twice a year my husband> <understandably> hits driver burn-out. At these times it is my> responsibility to be the voice of reason even if I am mired as deep> in the muck of the trucking industry as he is at the time. JWB> always has a way of helping me pull myself into the "big picture" so> I can be objective to counteract his burnout. >> Kind of like it's my husband's job to be the voice of reason when I'm> totally wrapped up in utter parenting chaos. He is able to provide> the "outside" view.>> amy OK - sounds like a good perspective. I wasn't exactly sure what you meant by his "driver burn out", but I presume that means he gets fed up with some of the bull**** he has to put up with in it, and/or he feels he's tired of doing it for a living (at least on some days).
            Actually, this burnout is a little different I think so it is sending up some red flags. Normal burnout for him is he needs to take a week-10 days off rather than "stop through the house for a couple days every six weeks". This one in particular I think was brought on by "the baby". The baby never really cared one way or another if he was here or not since he has been running this gig since he was born. It's been really hard on our older child who has spent alot of time with him. But the baby always thought he was cool since we usually had chocolate birthday cake or celebrated a holiday when he showed up but he was no big deal. NOW, they are developing a bond and I think it's going to make him crack. Normal signs of burnout? Money arguments.....I often miss this sign and don't de-personalize it. But I usually figure it out once we are ready to "divorce". LOL THIS time I'm seeing bigger signs....normally he's a "star driver" and "contractor of the month"......he hasn't been late for an appointment yet but he's having a really hard time keeping the truck moving down the road. He's talking increasing life insurance. <I know that sounds really dramamtic but he'll do that occassionally in "normal burnout"--his way of communicating "I can't provide for you....">. He dropped an empty trailer on the ground because the kingpin didn't latch. And he didn't even see that as a sign...... And the not so subtle sign, "I need to do something but I don't know what!" I'm actually surrounded by a good support system in this life but it seems at my moments of "bucking up and pulling myself together" to be the objective one JWB always manages to snap me out of it the fastest. Not that he ever changes my mind on my beliefs about trucking but somehow he makes an excellent sounding board so I can draw out what I need to right now. It does always seem that as soon as I have to snap out of it some dumb truckdriver does something incredibly stupid like fumbling for a cellphone and killing a kindergartener about to get on a bus which floods the trucking newsgroup with all the radical truck-haters and I find myself defending an industry that is causing upheaval in my life. And in my other support circles I'm stuck in the middle. I have a group of mentors and even my own batch of trainees...but I've been around long enough that the "mentor group" kind of brushes it off as "I know how to handle this" and my trainee circle is still in the honeymoon phase so I have to sugar coat it a little....anyway, JWB always manages to help me pull it all together. So sorry ya'll for boring you! amy
            Not in the least. It was interesting to hear about it, Amy.
            see all the great stuff you're missing out on?


            Comment


            • #51
              For Bill: Sorry, I just couldn't resist sending this to you ;-)

              "Amy D" <[email protected]> wrote in message
              news:[email protected]
              LOL--I can't explain it. I remember the first time we talked truck I literally hated you. Although I was pretty miserable in my life. But it's like a barometer to me -- once I lose that "you are looking down your nose" feeling I described I know I'm on top of my game. And it doesn't work with just anyone -- sometimes when I lose that feeling I'm just downright defensive, bitter, and terminally unique. It would never work if I just posted a thread saying "JWB, I need to talk truck" though -- it has to catch me off guard and it always happens at the right moment. SO I guess everyone is just going to have to suffer through it once or twice a year.
              well, the one thing I noticed about truckers is the incredible amount of
              pride many of them have. Perhaps these conversations draw that out in you.
              In other words, you may start thinking "trucking sucks", and then i come
              along and say "yea, trucking sucks", and then you say "wait a minute mister,
              it doesn't suck, and here's why".

              For the record, I really try to never look "down my nose" at anyone. I was
              broke for awhile in my life and know what it is like to have a landlord
              knocking at my door as I pretend I'm not home.


              Comment

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