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  • "Don't try this at home" ...

    In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came
    to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them
    an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the
    cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and
    breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make
    fun of him.

    Doug.
    --
    *** Number 178748389. Registered Linux User No. 277548.
    It's taken me all my life to understand that it is not necessary to
    understand everything.
    - Rene Coty.


  • #2
    "Don't try this at home" ...

    On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
    That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and
    learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his
    f%^$ing head off.

    -Tony

    --
    "If the grass appears to be greener on the other side of the fence, it's time
    to fertilize your lawn!"
    Want to jump start your marriage? Consider a Marriage Encounter weekend.
    Check out http://www.wwme.org for more information.

    Comment


    • #3
      &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

      On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw
      <[email protected]> wrote:
      In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
      That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and
      learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his
      f%^$ing head off.

      -Tony

      --
      "If the grass appears to be greener on the other side of the fence, it's time
      to fertilize your lawn!"
      Want to jump start your marriage? Consider a Marriage Encounter weekend.
      Check out http://www.wwme.org for more information.

      Comment


      • #4
        &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

        Tony Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
        On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]> wrote:
        In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
        That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his f%^$ing head off.
        If she were in Colorado, she would be able to do this legally. We have
        what is called a "make my day" law. You are allowed to shoot intruders
        in your home.

        Comment


        • #5
          &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

          Tony Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
          On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]ss.com.au> wrote:
          In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
          That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his f%^$ing head off.
          If she were in Colorado, she would be able to do this legally. We have
          what is called a "make my day" law. You are allowed to shoot intruders
          in your home.

          Comment


          • #6
            &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

            On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:27:37 GMT, Emma Anne
            <[email protected]> wrote:
            Tony Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
            On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]> wrote:
            In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
            That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his f%^$ing head off.
            If she were in Colorado, she would be able to do this legally. We have what is called a "make my day" law. You are allowed to shoot intruders in your home.
            So can we. It's called the "castle" law, but it only applies to your
            "castle". If the intruder falls outside of your home (castle), you'd
            better drag him back in.

            -Tony

            PS: Castle law also applies to your place of business.

            --
            "If the grass appears to be greener on the other side of the fence, it's time
            to fertilize your lawn!"
            Want to jump start your marriage? Consider a Marriage Encounter weekend.
            Check out http://www.wwme.org for more information.

            Comment


            • #7
              &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

              On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 17:27:37 GMT, Emma Anne
              <[email protected]> wrote:
              Tony Miller <[email protected]> wrote:
              On Wed, 04 Aug 2004 13:08:13 +1000, Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]> wrote:
              In today's paper: A man in the suburb where my wife and daughter work, came to his wife's house in breach of an order for her protection (we call them an "intervention order") and put a match to her wedding dress in the cupboard. The house burned down. He got three years' jail for arson and breach of the order. He had mental problems, so I probably shouldn't make fun of him.
              That's why women who have orders of protection ought to buy a shotgun and learn how to use it. If the guy comes into their home they blow his f%^$ing head off.
              If she were in Colorado, she would be able to do this legally. We have what is called a "make my day" law. You are allowed to shoot intruders in your home.
              So can we. It's called the "castle" law, but it only applies to your
              "castle". If the intruder falls outside of your home (castle), you'd
              better drag him back in.

              -Tony

              PS: Castle law also applies to your place of business.

              --
              "If the grass appears to be greener on the other side of the fence, it's time
              to fertilize your lawn!"
              Want to jump start your marriage? Consider a Marriage Encounter weekend.
              Check out http://www.wwme.org for more information.

              Comment


              • #8
                &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

                "Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]>" wrote:
                [T]he "castle" law only entitles you to use reasonable force. Injure him, and the b--- will sue you for damages. It has been done! Safer to call a policeman.
                Not necessarily. IIUC, the police (at least in the USA) have no
                obligation to defend you from an attacker. They sometimes do, of
                course, but if they decide not to, you can't sue them for anything, or
                otherwise get them in trouble.

                So if the cops show up, and decide to watch you and your attacker fight
                hand-to-hand, and maybe have some popcorn and sell tickets, and you get
                killed while this is going on, well, too bad for you.

                One commonly cited case on this point is:

                Warren v. District of Columbia, 444 A.2d 1 (D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)

                which you can read at:

                http://www.healylaw.com/cases/warren2.htm


                If you don't have the patience to read the whole thing, the short
                version is that two female housemates heard their third housemate being
                attacked by intruders. They called the police and were assured that
                officers were on the way. After the third housemate's screams stopped
                (some minutes later), they figured the cops had arrived, so they went
                downstairs. For the next 14 hours, the three women were beaten, robbed,
                raped, and other horrible things.

                They sued the police, and lost, because (as the court ruled), it is a
                "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents
                are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police
                protection, to any individual citizen."


                There are other cases, all with the same result. If the cops don't
                show up to protect you, that's your problem.


                Darren Provine ! [email protected] ! http://www.rowan.edu/~kilroy
                "I shall fear no evil, because I have my rod and my AR-15 to protect me."
                -- Templeton Peck

                Comment


                • #9
                  &quot;Don't try this at home&quot; ...

                  "Doug Laidlaw <[email protected]>" wrote:
                  [T]he "castle" law only entitles you to use reasonable force. Injure him, and the b--- will sue you for damages. It has been done! Safer to call a policeman.
                  Not necessarily. IIUC, the police (at least in the USA) have no
                  obligation to defend you from an attacker. They sometimes do, of
                  course, but if they decide not to, you can't sue them for anything, or
                  otherwise get them in trouble.

                  So if the cops show up, and decide to watch you and your attacker fight
                  hand-to-hand, and maybe have some popcorn and sell tickets, and you get
                  killed while this is going on, well, too bad for you.

                  One commonly cited case on this point is:

                  Warren v. District of Columbia, 444 A.2d 1 (D.C. Ct. of Ap., 1981)

                  which you can read at:

                  http://www.healylaw.com/cases/warren2.htm


                  If you don't have the patience to read the whole thing, the short
                  version is that two female housemates heard their third housemate being
                  attacked by intruders. They called the police and were assured that
                  officers were on the way. After the third housemate's screams stopped
                  (some minutes later), they figured the cops had arrived, so they went
                  downstairs. For the next 14 hours, the three women were beaten, robbed,
                  raped, and other horrible things.

                  They sued the police, and lost, because (as the court ruled), it is a
                  "fundamental principle of American law that a government and its agents
                  are under no general duty to provide public services, such as police
                  protection, to any individual citizen."


                  There are other cases, all with the same result. If the cops don't
                  show up to protect you, that's your problem.


                  Darren Provine ! [email protected] ! http://www.rowan.edu/~kilroy
                  "I shall fear no evil, because I have my rod and my AR-15 to protect me."
                  -- Templeton Peck

                  Comment

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