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  • Doubt about a foreign-born president

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...chive/2004/10/
    06/MNGTU94F6D1.DTL

    Doubt about a foreign-born president
    Feinstein, others cool to changing Constitution's rules
    Edward Epstein, Chronicle Washington Bureau

    Wednesday, October 6, 2004

    Washington -- Comments from skeptical senators Tuesday showed why proposed
    constitutional amendments that would allow naturalized citizens to run for
    president, an idea pushed by supporters of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, face an
    uphill struggle in winning enactment.

    Chief among the skeptics at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing was Sen.
    Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who said she was very reluctant to support changes
    to the Constitution's Article 2, Section 1. It sets the requirements for
    serving as president -- a minimum of 35 years of age, 14 years continuous
    residence in the country and being a "natural-born citizen.''

    "I don't think we should move precipitously,'' Feinstein said. She said the
    Constitution's ban on immigrants serving as president created a "reserved right
    of birth for the presidency. It may not be a bad thing. It may be a
    strengthening thing,'' a way of holding the country together by allowing
    immigrants to meld into American society and permitting their children to run
    for president.

    And while many backers of Schwarzenegger, the state's 57-year-old movie star
    turned governor who was born in Graz, Austria, are avidly behind amending the
    Constitution, Feinstein said she had seen no citizen interest in the idea.

    "I've never had anyone approach me and say you have to do this because it's so
    important,'' Feinstein said. Besides, she added, "I think this amendment will
    have a very hard time'' getting the needed two-thirds votes in both houses of
    Congress and approval from three-fourths of the states.

    Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, hasn't made up his mind on the issue, but he takes a
    nuanced approach. An adoption advocate, Craig said Americans bring home 25,000
    foreign children annually for adoption, and "to suggest those children would be
    denied that right (of serving as president) is a tough one."

    But he said that for adult immigrants such as Schwarzenegger, who came to the
    United States in 1968 and became a citizen in 1983, the situation may be
    different. Craig said such immigrants need to be citizens long enough "to be
    imbued with belief in this country's constitutional system.''

    There are several proposals in Congress aimed at allowing naturalized
    immigrants to serve as president. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a friend of
    Schwarzenegger's, has proposed a 20-year citizenship requirement. In the House,
    his plan is mirrored by a proposal offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-
    Huntington Beach (Orange County), a big supporter of the governor.

    A 35-year citizenship requirement has been proposed by Rep. Vic Snyder, D- Ark.
    Others suggest a 14-year minimum, to match the Constitution's requirement for
    continuous residence.

    Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., takes a different approach, proposing a law that
    would clear up murky points in the Constitution as to whether children born to
    Americans abroad or in U.S. territories that aren't part of the 50 states or
    the District of Columbia could be president. Questions about this unclear
    provision arose when Barry Goldwater, who was born in Arizona before it became
    a state in 1912, ran for president in 1964.

    Backers of all the proposals may try to advance their bills in the next
    Congress.

    In his comments, Hatch didn't mention Schwarzenegger, and he introduced his
    amendment before the governor entered the 2003 recall election. But Hatch
    mentioned as potential candidates who can't run such longtime foreign-born
    public servants as former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and Madeleine
    Albright, and Michigan's Democratic Gov. Jennifer Granholm.

    Hatch said the constitutional restriction "has become an anachronism that is
    decidedly un-American. Consistent with our democratic form of government, our
    citizens should have every opportunity to choose their leaders free of
    unreasonable limitations.''

    The ban on immigrants serving as president had a reason behind it, says Akhil
    Reed Amar, professor of law and political science at Yale University. At the
    time of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, there were reports of maneuvers
    aimed at putting Prince Henry of Prussia or the bishop of Osnaburgh, a son of
    England's King George III, on an American throne.

    But the ban is an anachronism today, Amar says. "In a land of immigrants
    committed to the dream of equality, the Constitution's natural-born clause
    seems, well, un-American,'' he said in his prepared testimony before the Senate
    Judiciary Committee.

    In the audience for the hearing was Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones of Menlo Park, who
    backs Hatch's proposal.

    Morgenthaler-Jones is founder of Amendforarnold.com, which has already printed
    buttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts promoting an amendment that would let the
    governor run for president. Schwarzenegger has endorsed changing the
    Constitution but won't say if he is seriously interested in running for
    president.

    "He's a fiscal conservative, and he's socially liberal,'' she said. "He's what
    we've been waiting for.''



    -------------------------
    A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friend will
    be sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!"
    -----Unknown

  • #2
    Doubt about a foreign-born president

    Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son can't
    run for president doesn't bother me at all.

    Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around.

    J.



    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...chive/2004/10/06/MNGTU94F6D1.DTLDoubt about a foreign-born presidentFeinstein, others cool to changing Constitution's rulesEdward Epstein, Chronicle Washington BureauWednesday, October 6, 2004Washington -- Comments from skeptical senators Tuesday showed why proposedconstitutional amendments that would allow naturalized citizens to run forpresident, an idea pushed by supporters of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, faceanuphill struggle in winning enactment.Chief among the skeptics at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing was Sen.Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who said she was very reluctant to supportchangesto the Constitution's Article 2, Section 1. It sets the requirements forserving as president -- a minimum of 35 years of age, 14 years continuousresidence in the country and being a "natural-born citizen.''"I don't think we should move precipitously,'' Feinstein said. She said theConstitution's ban on immigrants serving as president created a "reservedrightof birth for the presidency. It may not be a bad thing. It may be astrengthening thing,'' a way of holding the country together by allowingimmigrants to meld into American society and permitting their children to runfor president.And while many backers of Schwarzenegger, the state's 57-year-old movie starturned governor who was born in Graz, Austria, are avidly behind amending theConstitution, Feinstein said she had seen no citizen interest in the idea."I've never had anyone approach me and say you have to do this because it'ssoimportant,'' Feinstein said. Besides, she added, "I think this amendment willhave a very hard time'' getting the needed two-thirds votes in both houses ofCongress and approval from three-fourths of the states.Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, hasn't made up his mind on the issue, but he takesanuanced approach. An adoption advocate, Craig said Americans bring home25,000foreign children annually for adoption, and "to suggest those children wouldbedenied that right (of serving as president) is a tough one."But he said that for adult immigrants such as Schwarzenegger, who came to theUnited States in 1968 and became a citizen in 1983, the situation may bedifferent. Craig said such immigrants need to be citizens long enough "to beimbued with belief in this country's constitutional system.''There are several proposals in Congress aimed at allowing naturalizedimmigrants to serve as president. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a friend ofSchwarzenegger's, has proposed a 20-year citizenship requirement. In theHouse,his plan is mirrored by a proposal offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Huntington Beach (Orange County), a big supporter of the governor.A 35-year citizenship requirement has been proposed by Rep. Vic Snyder, D-Ark.Others suggest a 14-year minimum, to match the Constitution's requirement forcontinuous residence.Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., takes a different approach, proposing a law thatwould clear up murky points in the Constitution as to whether children borntoAmericans abroad or in U.S. territories that aren't part of the 50 states orthe District of Columbia could be president. Questions about this unclearprovision arose when Barry Goldwater, who was born in Arizona before itbecamea state in 1912, ran for president in 1964.Backers of all the proposals may try to advance their bills in the nextCongress.In his comments, Hatch didn't mention Schwarzenegger, and he introduced hisamendment before the governor entered the 2003 recall election. But Hatchmentioned as potential candidates who can't run such longtime foreign-bornpublic servants as former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and MadeleineAlbright, and Michigan's Democratic Gov. Jennifer Granholm.Hatch said the constitutional restriction "has become an anachronism that isdecidedly un-American. Consistent with our democratic form of government, ourcitizens should have every opportunity to choose their leaders free ofunreasonable limitations.''The ban on immigrants serving as president had a reason behind it, says AkhilReed Amar, professor of law and political science at Yale University. At thetime of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, there were reports ofmaneuversaimed at putting Prince Henry of Prussia or the bishop of Osnaburgh, a son ofEngland's King George III, on an American throne.But the ban is an anachronism today, Amar says. "In a land of immigrantscommitted to the dream of equality, the Constitution's natural-born clauseseems, well, un-American,'' he said in his prepared testimony before theSenateJudiciary Committee.In the audience for the hearing was Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones of Menlo Park,whobacks Hatch's proposal.Morgenthaler-Jones is founder of Amendforarnold.com, which has alreadyprintedbuttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts promoting an amendment that would letthegovernor run for president. Schwarzenegger has endorsed changing theConstitution but won't say if he is seriously interested in running forpresident."He's a fiscal conservative, and he's socially liberal,'' she said. "He'swhatwe've been waiting for.''-------------------------A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friendwillbe sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!"-----Unknown



    Reply to jmhjmd at aol.


    Comment


    • #3
      Doubt about a foreign-born president


      "J." <[email protected]> wrote in message
      news:[email protected]
      Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son
      can't
      run for president doesn't bother me at all. Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around. J.
      There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was put
      in the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is a
      huge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of one
      certain country.

      Marley
      http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...chive/2004/10/
      06/MNGTU94F6D1.DTLDoubt about a foreign-born presidentFeinstein, others cool to changing Constitution's rulesEdward Epstein, Chronicle Washington BureauWednesday, October 6, 2004Washington -- Comments from skeptical senators Tuesday showed why
      proposed
      constitutional amendments that would allow naturalized citizens to run
      for
      president, an idea pushed by supporters of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger,
      face
      anuphill struggle in winning enactment.Chief among the skeptics at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing was Sen.Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who said she was very reluctant to supportchangesto the Constitution's Article 2, Section 1. It sets the requirements forserving as president -- a minimum of 35 years of age, 14 years continuousresidence in the country and being a "natural-born citizen.''"I don't think we should move precipitously,'' Feinstein said. She said
      the
      Constitution's ban on immigrants serving as president created a "reservedrightof birth for the presidency. It may not be a bad thing. It may be astrengthening thing,'' a way of holding the country together by allowingimmigrants to meld into American society and permitting their children to
      run
      for president.And while many backers of Schwarzenegger, the state's 57-year-old movie
      star
      turned governor who was born in Graz, Austria, are avidly behind amending
      the
      Constitution, Feinstein said she had seen no citizen interest in the
      idea.
      "I've never had anyone approach me and say you have to do this because
      it's
      soimportant,'' Feinstein said. Besides, she added, "I think this amendment
      will
      have a very hard time'' getting the needed two-thirds votes in both
      houses of
      Congress and approval from three-fourths of the states.Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, hasn't made up his mind on the issue, but he
      takes
      anuanced approach. An adoption advocate, Craig said Americans bring home25,000foreign children annually for adoption, and "to suggest those children
      would
      bedenied that right (of serving as president) is a tough one."But he said that for adult immigrants such as Schwarzenegger, who came to
      the
      United States in 1968 and became a citizen in 1983, the situation may bedifferent. Craig said such immigrants need to be citizens long enough "to
      be
      imbued with belief in this country's constitutional system.''There are several proposals in Congress aimed at allowing naturalizedimmigrants to serve as president. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a friend ofSchwarzenegger's, has proposed a 20-year citizenship requirement. In theHouse,his plan is mirrored by a proposal offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Huntington Beach (Orange County), a big supporter of the governor.A 35-year citizenship requirement has been proposed by Rep. Vic Snyder,
      D-
      Ark.Others suggest a 14-year minimum, to match the Constitution's requirement
      for
      continuous residence.Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., takes a different approach, proposing a law
      that
      would clear up murky points in the Constitution as to whether children
      born
      toAmericans abroad or in U.S. territories that aren't part of the 50 states
      or
      the District of Columbia could be president. Questions about this unclearprovision arose when Barry Goldwater, who was born in Arizona before itbecamea state in 1912, ran for president in 1964.Backers of all the proposals may try to advance their bills in the nextCongress.In his comments, Hatch didn't mention Schwarzenegger, and he introduced
      his
      amendment before the governor entered the 2003 recall election. But Hatchmentioned as potential candidates who can't run such longtime
      foreign-born
      public servants as former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and
      Madeleine
      Albright, and Michigan's Democratic Gov. Jennifer Granholm.Hatch said the constitutional restriction "has become an anachronism that
      is
      decidedly un-American. Consistent with our democratic form of government,
      our
      citizens should have every opportunity to choose their leaders free ofunreasonable limitations.''The ban on immigrants serving as president had a reason behind it, says
      Akhil
      Reed Amar, professor of law and political science at Yale University. At
      the
      time of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, there were reports ofmaneuversaimed at putting Prince Henry of Prussia or the bishop of Osnaburgh, a
      son of
      England's King George III, on an American throne.But the ban is an anachronism today, Amar says. "In a land of immigrantscommitted to the dream of equality, the Constitution's natural-born
      clause
      seems, well, un-American,'' he said in his prepared testimony before theSenateJudiciary Committee.In the audience for the hearing was Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones of Menlo
      Park,
      whobacks Hatch's proposal.Morgenthaler-Jones is founder of Amendforarnold.com, which has alreadyprintedbuttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts promoting an amendment that would
      let
      thegovernor run for president. Schwarzenegger has endorsed changing theConstitution but won't say if he is seriously interested in running forpresident."He's a fiscal conservative, and he's socially liberal,'' she said. "He'swhatwe've been waiting for.''-------------------------A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friendwillbe sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!"-----Unknown Reply to jmhjmd at aol.

      Comment


      • #4
        Doubt about a foreign-born president

        >
        "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]
        Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son
        can't
        run for president doesn't bother me at all. Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around. J.
        There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was putin the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is ahuge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of onecertain country.Marley

        Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat.

        J.





        Reply to jmhjmd at aol.


        Comment


        • #5
          Doubt about a foreign-born president

          [email protected]ostible (J.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
          "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]
          Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son
          can't
          run for president doesn't bother me at all. Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around. J.There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was putin the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is ahuge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of onecertain country.Marley
          Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. J.
          That's what we want you to think, anyway.

          Tom

          Comment


          • #6
            Doubt about a foreign-born president

            [email protected] (Tom) wrote in message news:<[email protected] om>...
            [email protected]ostible (J.) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
            "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]> Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son
            can't
            > run for president doesn't bother me at all.>> Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around.>> J.There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was putin the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is ahuge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of onecertain country.Marley Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. J.
            That's what we want you to think, anyway.
            Now look what you've gone and done.
            We'll never achieve world domination.

            Rh.
            Tom

            Comment


            • #7
              Doubt about a foreign-born president

              >Subject: Re: Doubt about a foreign-born president
              From: [email protected] (Rhiannon)Date: 10/8/2004 7:48 PM Mountain Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>
              Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. J. That's what we want you to think, anyway.Now look what you've gone and done.We'll never achieve world domination.Rh.
              Ahh. The power of cheese.


              -------------------------
              A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friend will
              be sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!"
              -----Unknown

              Comment


              • #8
                Doubt about a foreign-born president

                You'll be around.

                "J." <[email protected]> wrote in message
                news:[email protected]
                Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my son
                can't
                run for president doesn't bother me at all. Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around. J.http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/articl...chive/2004/10/
                06/MNGTU94F6D1.DTLDoubt about a foreign-born presidentFeinstein, others cool to changing Constitution's rulesEdward Epstein, Chronicle Washington BureauWednesday, October 6, 2004Washington -- Comments from skeptical senators Tuesday showed why
                proposed
                constitutional amendments that would allow naturalized citizens to run
                for
                president, an idea pushed by supporters of Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger,
                face
                anuphill struggle in winning enactment.Chief among the skeptics at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing was Sen.Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., who said she was very reluctant to supportchangesto the Constitution's Article 2, Section 1. It sets the requirements forserving as president -- a minimum of 35 years of age, 14 years continuousresidence in the country and being a "natural-born citizen.''"I don't think we should move precipitously,'' Feinstein said. She said
                the
                Constitution's ban on immigrants serving as president created a "reservedrightof birth for the presidency. It may not be a bad thing. It may be astrengthening thing,'' a way of holding the country together by allowingimmigrants to meld into American society and permitting their children to
                run
                for president.And while many backers of Schwarzenegger, the state's 57-year-old movie
                star
                turned governor who was born in Graz, Austria, are avidly behind amending
                the
                Constitution, Feinstein said she had seen no citizen interest in the
                idea.
                "I've never had anyone approach me and say you have to do this because
                it's
                soimportant,'' Feinstein said. Besides, she added, "I think this amendment
                will
                have a very hard time'' getting the needed two-thirds votes in both
                houses of
                Congress and approval from three-fourths of the states.Sen. Larry Craig, R-Idaho, hasn't made up his mind on the issue, but he
                takes
                anuanced approach. An adoption advocate, Craig said Americans bring home25,000foreign children annually for adoption, and "to suggest those children
                would
                bedenied that right (of serving as president) is a tough one."But he said that for adult immigrants such as Schwarzenegger, who came to
                the
                United States in 1968 and became a citizen in 1983, the situation may bedifferent. Craig said such immigrants need to be citizens long enough "to
                be
                imbued with belief in this country's constitutional system.''There are several proposals in Congress aimed at allowing naturalizedimmigrants to serve as president. Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, a friend ofSchwarzenegger's, has proposed a 20-year citizenship requirement. In theHouse,his plan is mirrored by a proposal offered by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Huntington Beach (Orange County), a big supporter of the governor.A 35-year citizenship requirement has been proposed by Rep. Vic Snyder,
                D-
                Ark.Others suggest a 14-year minimum, to match the Constitution's requirement
                for
                continuous residence.Sen. Don Nickles, R-Okla., takes a different approach, proposing a law
                that
                would clear up murky points in the Constitution as to whether children
                born
                toAmericans abroad or in U.S. territories that aren't part of the 50 states
                or
                the District of Columbia could be president. Questions about this unclearprovision arose when Barry Goldwater, who was born in Arizona before itbecamea state in 1912, ran for president in 1964.Backers of all the proposals may try to advance their bills in the nextCongress.In his comments, Hatch didn't mention Schwarzenegger, and he introduced
                his
                amendment before the governor entered the 2003 recall election. But Hatchmentioned as potential candidates who can't run such longtime
                foreign-born
                public servants as former Secretaries of State Henry Kissinger and
                Madeleine
                Albright, and Michigan's Democratic Gov. Jennifer Granholm.Hatch said the constitutional restriction "has become an anachronism that
                is
                decidedly un-American. Consistent with our democratic form of government,
                our
                citizens should have every opportunity to choose their leaders free ofunreasonable limitations.''The ban on immigrants serving as president had a reason behind it, says
                Akhil
                Reed Amar, professor of law and political science at Yale University. At
                the
                time of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, there were reports ofmaneuversaimed at putting Prince Henry of Prussia or the bishop of Osnaburgh, a
                son of
                England's King George III, on an American throne.But the ban is an anachronism today, Amar says. "In a land of immigrantscommitted to the dream of equality, the Constitution's natural-born
                clause
                seems, well, un-American,'' he said in his prepared testimony before theSenateJudiciary Committee.In the audience for the hearing was Lissa Morgenthaler-Jones of Menlo
                Park,
                whobacks Hatch's proposal.Morgenthaler-Jones is founder of Amendforarnold.com, which has alreadyprintedbuttons, bumper stickers and T-shirts promoting an amendment that would
                let
                thegovernor run for president. Schwarzenegger has endorsed changing theConstitution but won't say if he is seriously interested in running forpresident."He's a fiscal conservative, and he's socially liberal,'' she said. "He'swhatwe've been waiting for.''-------------------------A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friendwillbe sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!"-----Unknown Reply to jmhjmd at aol.

                ---
                Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
                Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
                Version: 6.0.771 / Virus Database: 518 - Release Date: 9/28/04


                Comment


                • #9
                  Doubt about a foreign-born president


                  "J." <[email protected]> wrote in message
                  news:[email protected]
                  "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]
                  Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my
                  son
                  can't
                  run for president doesn't bother me at all. Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around. J.
                  There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was
                  put
                  in the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is
                  a
                  huge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of onecertain country.Marley Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. J.

                  LOL. Just you wait...

                  Deanna



                  ---
                  Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
                  Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
                  Version: 6.0.771 / Virus Database: 518 - Release Date: 9/28/04


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Doubt about a foreign-born president

                    >
                    "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]
                    "J." <[email protected]> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]> Given the caliber of today's presidential campaigns, the fact that my
                    son
                    can't> run for president doesn't bother me at all.>> Maybe I'll change my mind as he approaches 35, if I'm still around.>> J.There were very sound reasons why the bar on foreign born presidents was
                    put
                    in the Constitution, and I think they are very valid today. Loyality is
                    a
                    huge issue, especially when the US has become the client state of onecertain country.Marley Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. J.
                    LOL. Just you wait...Deanna
                    Given the number of north-of-the-border responses this drew, I'm going to have
                    to re-think my position over a bottle of Molson's.

                    J.





                    Reply to jmhjmd at aol.


                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Doubt about a foreign-born president

                      [email protected] (LilMtnCbn) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
                      Subject: Re: Doubt about a foreign-born presidentFrom: [email protected] (Rhiannon)Date: 10/8/2004 7:48 PM Mountain Standard TimeMessage-id: <[email protected]>
                      > > Ahhh, Canada's not such a threat. > > J. > > That's what we want you to think, anyway. > >Now look what you've gone and done.We'll never achieve world domination.Rh.
                      Ahh. The power of cheese.
                      Careful now, for fear of what you might invoke ..
                      Remember those ominous words .. "And I will not slam the door .. "
                      ------------------------- A good friend will come and bail you out of jail . . . but, a true friend will be sitting next to you saying, "**** . . . that was fun!" -----Unknown

                      Comment

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