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A Putative father's options to stop adoption proceedings. California

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  • A Putative father's options to stop adoption proceedings. California

    I am a concerned father inquiring on behalf of my son on a most unfortunate matter that has come up. As a parent, it is my hope that someone's fruitful knowledge of California adoption laws and procedures might be shared in a way that can be of tremendous benefit to taking the appropriate steps to resolve the situation at hand. The case in a nutshell:

    In the "beginning", my 25 year old son and a 27 year old female decided to share an apartment in San Diego California as roomates. But even though they started out as simple roomates, they began having consensual and intermitten sex. In spite of their behavior, neither of them considered the other as fiancées or in any type of committed relationship other than "friends". To make a long story short; my son's roomate became pregnant and decided to conceal her pregnancy from him. Her resolve was so great that she was able to deceive my son for six months. When she was six months pregnant, she moved to a different apartment and he decided to move closer to his family (in Bakersfield California). After she conceived the child, she put him up for an adoption (apparantly this was her plan all along). Soon After she gave the baby up, she communicated to my son that she had his baby and that it was her decision to put him up for an adoption (listing on the birth certificate that she didn't know who the father was). After finding this information out, my son contacted the adoption agency claiming himself as the father and the desire to raise his child. Of course, the agency is not doing a thing about it and needless to say my son is becoming more distraught as time goes on.

    The baby was born during the last week of June and my son was told during the first week of July. By the second week of July, the agency was informed of this matter. What I would like to know is how does California adoption procedure (more specifically in San Diego county) view a putative father matter in a situation as his? Typically, if a putative father showed signs of caring and nurturing before birth and has notified through the courts about his claim to be the natural father, he more than likely would be able to gain custody of the child. But what about a case where the putative father was never told until after the child was given up? Obviously, he was never given the opportunity to display a father's commitment to child because of her decision to deceive him and her plan to give the baby up for adoption. What course of action would you suggest my son take and how much of a window does he have to inform the court of his desire to establish paternity? It's obviouse that he will need a lawyer, but some general information would be great. How realistic are his chances to stop adoption proceedings and how can he force a paternity test to establish his rights as a natural father. I would appreciate your knowledge on the matter.

    A concerned father and grandfather
    Last edited by suave; 09-22-2007, 04:19 PM. Reason: inappropriate word
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