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17, 18 on oct 5th, can i move out earlier? Tennessee

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  • Lauren_mcd
    replied
    Originally posted by cbg View Post
    [I]Bottom line; You have less than a month before you can leave legally, live wherever you like and no one can stop you. Do you really want to risk messing up both your lives for that little time?

    no, i dont want to risk messing everything up. i have a job and everything all set up for me when i do move up there. and he has things going good for him as well. but thanks for your input. i appreciate it greatly.

    Leave a comment:


  • cbg
    replied
    after i bought the bus ticket and everything, she has changed her mind because she thinks that lawfully shes not allowed to do that. is that true?

    No, she can give you permission to move out but she is also legally entitled to change her mind and refuse permission. Even after you have already moved, until your 18th birthday she can revoke permission at any time.

    what would happen if i left anyways without her permission?

    You could be declared a runaway and hauled back where you belong by the seat of your pants, if necessary. Whether or not that would happen is questionable since you are so close to 18 but it COULD happen. Nothing in the law would prevent it. If your 18th birthday is October 5, then any time up to and including October 4 you can be REQUIRED to return to your parents or legal guardian.

    but since my boyfriend is over 18, is there anything my mom would be able to do to him if i left to live with him??

    **** straight she could. Since you would be crossing state lines he could face Federal charges. Just because HE is over 18 doesn't mean YOU can go wherever you like. He has no legal authority over you and no legal right to relocate you.

    Bottom line; You have less than a month before you can leave legally, live wherever you like and no one can stop you. Do you really want to risk messing up both your lives for that little time?
    Last edited by cbg; 09-09-2008, 11:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 17, 18 on oct 5th, can i move out earlier? Tennessee

    im 17 and i am turning 18 on october 5th. i lived with my mom and her husband for awhile but i felt i was being emotionally abused and i couldnt deal with their alcoholism, so i moved in with my dad. i just recently started staying at my moms again and the abuse continued. i dont want to go back to my dads house because he isnt financially stable and is having trouble taking care of himself, much less me too.

    anyways..my boyfriend lives in illinois and i am wanting to move up there with him. i told my mom about it and at first she said i could go. but after i bought the bus ticket and everything, she has changed her mind because she thinks that lawfully shes not allowed to do that. is that true?

    what would happen if i left anyways without her permission?

    we have a teen center in nashville and i sent them an email asking if it would still be considered running away. they replied and said it would, but the police probably wouldnt do anything about it since i am so close to being 18.

    but since my boyfriend is over 18, is there anything my mom would be able to do to him if i left to live with him??

    please answer asap with any responses of advice or anything. i really need to know soon.
    Last edited by Lauren_mcd; 09-09-2008, 11:13 AM.
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