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Last name change. Illinois

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  • Last name change. Illinois

    MY little girl is 2 years old now and her mother and i broke up with me 1 month before she was born. She gave my daughter her last name. My name is on the birth certificate and i signed my name on the Voluntary acknowledgement of paternity. I have been trying my hardest to see her as much as possible for the past 2 years but her mother is very selfish when it comes to visitation. My question is, can i legally have my daughters name switched to mine? Since i had no control over that since she basically told my daughter and ran.

  • #2
    As far as the visitation, is there a court order setting out custody/visitation? If not, you need to get one. There is no legal obligation to allow you to have any contact until there is a court order.

    What's the big deal about the name? WHY do you want to change it?
    HOOK 'EM HORNS!!!
    How do you catch a very rare rabbit?
    (unique up on him)
    How do catch an ordinary rabbit?
    (same way)

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes, there is a court order for visitation. I didn't have a lawyer nor could i afford the mediation at the time so i had to settle for what her lawyer offered me. Just 2 hours at a time ever other week. I want to get more visitation now since i have been paying support payments and i can afford what it takes to go through court and mediation.

      I want my daughter to have my last name because she is MY daughter.
      Last edited by Ildad; 01-25-2008, 03:28 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ildad View Post
        Yes, there is a court order for visitation. I didn't have a lawyer nor could i afford the mediation at the time so i had to settle for what her lawyer offered me. Just 2 hours at a time ever other week. I want to get more visitation now since i have been paying support payments and i can afford what it takes to go through court and mediation.

        I want my daughter to have my last name because she is MY daughter.
        Okay, that reasoning won't wash because she is NOT just 'your' daughter. She has her other parent's last name. Mom can EASILY make the same point. Further, she can add that the child knows her name (as is), and that since the child lives with her it is in the child's best interest that they have the same last name. (You have no idea how annoying it is to have to go through the drill of correcting everybody when they call you by your child's last name and then the skeptism and extra scrutiny when you are trying to pick your child up from school.)

        A better option is to hyphenate the child's last name with BOTH names.
        HOOK 'EM HORNS!!!
        How do you catch a very rare rabbit?
        (unique up on him)
        How do catch an ordinary rabbit?
        (same way)

        Comment


        • #5
          I know that every state is different..... but just to emphasize the ability of a mother to give her children whatever name she wishes sometimes, I will supply this info:

          1999
          My husbands daughter was living with her bio-mom. The daughter and her mother still had my husbands last name.... She became pregnant with twins, by a married man. So, when her twins were born she gave them the last name she had at the time...... the same as her other child. She said she did this because the children would all 3 have the same last name.
          The truth was she was telling everyone in town that the twins were his in an attempt to protect the married father.....
          My husband called the court to find out if there was anything he could do, and was obviously told that she could name her children whatever she wanted...

          God Bless!
          Amy

          Comment

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