Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Father denied child medication California

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Father denied child medication California

    My youngest daughter was at her father's for a week-end visitation. She was recently prescribed Xantac for severe stomach pains. She is scheduled for a follow up visit in two weeks. The Xantac has been helping her.

    Ex's most recent girlfriend is a delivery room nurse. She told the ex, and my daughter, that children are never prescribed that drug because it causes sever liver damage. They refused to let my daughter take her medication. It was only two doses that she missed, but by the time she got home, her stomach was hurting again. As soon as she took her medication, she began to feel better. She is almost 13 years of age.

    I have written this down in the journal that I keep. Is there anything further that needs to be done in terms of documenting this? I have not said anything to him or the girlfriend, but I have decided that if she is on medication of any kind, her visitation with him will be postponed until she is NOT on medication. If he wants to have me cited for contempt, so be it.

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by Rodulu
    My youngest daughter was at her father's for a week-end visitation. She was recently prescribed Xantac for severe stomach pains. She is scheduled for a follow up visit in two weeks. The Xantac has been helping her.

    Ex's most recent girlfriend is a delivery room nurse. She told the ex, and my daughter, that children are never prescribed that drug because it causes sever liver damage. They refused to let my daughter take her medication. It was only two doses that she missed, but by the time she got home, her stomach was hurting again. As soon as she took her medication, she began to feel better. She is almost 13 years of age.

    I have written this down in the journal that I keep. Is there anything further that needs to be done in terms of documenting this? I have not said anything to him or the girlfriend, but I have decided that if she is on medication of any kind, her visitation with him will be postponed until she is NOT on medication. If he wants to have me cited for contempt, so be it.

    Thanks!
    You need to send a certified, return reciept letter stating that you are aware of what happened with the medication during visitation. (Be sure to keep a copy for your self). You need to strongly (but cleanly, no name calling) state that this will not be tolerated in the future. You also need to clearly state in the letter that while you are aware that she is a nurse, she is not a DOCTOR and does not have the kowledge or the LEGAL right to dispense contrary medical "orders" that goes directly against your daughter's MD's orders. She is not privy to all of the medical details and history that your doctor is. She has no business prescibing or blocking prescribed medical treatment for you daughter except in a case of first aid. (band aid, ice, ace bandage, anything that any normal person would tend to outside of going to a doctor for treatment)

    That way, in the future, you will have the proof that you have addressed this issue yourself before seeking the court's input.
    HOOK 'EM HORNS!!!
    How do you catch a very rare rabbit?
    (unique up on him)
    How do catch an ordinary rabbit?
    (same way)

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you!

      You're absolutely right - I'll send the letter today. And I'll be nice

      Thanks Mommy of Four!

      Comment


      • #4
        According to my Nursing2005 Drug Handbook; Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, published by Springhouse

        (I keep my current editions at work (Trauma RN) so that when someone asks a question about one of the tens of thousands of medications that are used in today's medicine, I can, as a professional, give the most accurate information available to the patients I see, rather than give erroneous information that may harm or otherwise misinform such as the case of the aforementioned "professional" gf)

        "Zantac" (rantidine hydrochloride) has and is prescribed for children as young as ONE MONTH OLD. There are certain restrictions for those persons with hepatic or renal dysfunction or disease and these contraindications would necessarily be examined and considered by the child's physician prior to prescribing the medication.

        I wonder if the "delivery room nurse" ever bothered to look up the side effects of "Tylenol" (acetaminophen) which actually lists "Liver Damage" as a potential side effect, (whereas rantidine hydrochloride lists jaundice only under hepatic adverse reactions). I say this because, for pregnant women, whose organ systems and bodies are under tremendous strain, there are very few medications that physicians will recommend. "Tylenol" is by far the most widely used medication for women during pregnancy. Since the gf is a "delivery room nurse", I figure she should know this.

        Sorry, probably wrong place to rant, but it really bothers me to hear of someone supposedly in my profession using such poor judgement.
        Last edited by Ohio "Step" Mom; 06-13-2006, 08:49 PM.
        Don't listen to a word I say because ya know I've gotta be crazy to be a Brown's fan.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thank you

          Thank you Ohio Step Mom. And as far as I'm concerned this is a fine place to rant - especially when it's an as informed, well research, and well thought out, rant as yours

          And also, I do appreciate the info on the medicine. She seems to be doing well with it, and she has a follow up after two weeks (one more week to go) to determine if she needs to continue the meds, or do more testing.

          Again, thank you so much for the information! (And the rant!)

          Rodulu

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Rodulu
            Thank you Ohio Step Mom. And as far as I'm concerned this is a fine place to rant - especially when it's an as informed, well research, and well thought out, rant as yours

            And also, I do appreciate the info on the medicine. She seems to be doing well with it, and she has a follow up after two weeks (one more week to go) to determine if she needs to continue the meds, or do more testing.

            Again, thank you so much for the information! (And the rant!)

            Rodulu
            A letter from YOU is not really going to accomplish much. Unless your court order specifically states that YOU are the only one allowed to make medical decisions for the child, dad is well within HIS rights to not give HIS child the medication at this point.

            You need to send dad and his attorney, if he has one a certified letter from the DOCTOR that prescribed the medication that clearly explains what tests have been done, what if any diagnoses have been made and a clear concise explanation of WHY the medication was prescribed.

            Even then, dad is not LEGALLY obligated to medicate the child while he has physical custody of her, unless YOU are the sole decision maker (which would be very unusual). But a letter from the DOCTOR would most likely be taken more seriously.

            There is nothing short of a court order that can FORCE dad to medicate the child. These types of cases are happening more and more and unless the medication means the difference between life and death, the courts don't like getting involved. Americans in general are over medicated, but it is even worse in children (I'm NOT saying that this is true in YOUR DAUGHTER'S case, just in general). What would have been considered a behavior problem 10 years ago is now called ADD or ADHD. I'm sure that is is an accurate diagnosis in SOME cases, but I feel that in MOST cases, is it just easier for a parent or a teacher to say "The kid has ADD, here's a pill", then it is to address the REAL problem, which is that the child has never been TAUGHT how to properly behave.

            A child has a temperature of 99 degrees and a parent loads them up with acetaminophen and ibuprofen, which in the long run is usually the WORST thing to do. A fever is the bodies way of fighting off infections. So when the natural process is interrupted, the infection wins in many cases and then the child need antibiotics to fight the infection. Which in turn, makes these normally harmless infections mutate into drug resistant nightmares.

            So , I'll stop my tirade on over medicating children. But now you have some idea of the arguments you would likely come up against if this had to be fought out in court.

            Since your daughter is 13, she is old enough to know how to take her medication without help from dad. Have you tried just giving her only the amount of pills she need while she'll be gone and leaving dad out of the equation? It's a little sneaky and maybe even a tiny bit deceptive, but it's probably not a violation of the court order. As long as you explain thing to your daughter and tell her not to LIE to dad IF he asks, it could solve the problem.

            Comment

            The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
            Working...
            X