Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

No More Overtime Policy - I was Terminated for adjusting my time. Florida

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • No More Overtime Policy - I was Terminated for adjusting my time. Florida

    I was recently terminated from my job for adjusting/falsifying my timesheet. The only reason I was doing this was because in March of this year we were told there would no longer be "overtime" paid. Since I always worked overtime I had to adjust my time to make sure I wouldn't go over the 40 hours. I appealed my termination which was recently denied. However, the company is willing to pay me over 100 hrs of overtime. I feel that I was singled out because the person in charge of timekeeping for the office is currently adjusting employee's time too. Yet, I was the only one terminated. There has to be something that can be done to get justice for what has happened to me. There has to be something that can be filled with the EEOC or someone else because of what is happening in that office. Singling me out was wrong and not to mention the fact that the parking garage was not authorized by me to give any information to my manager, yet they did and it's what the company is basing my termination on.
    Please help me get justice.

  • #2
    Sorry, but you aren't going to get any sympathy from me. You got justice. You falsified your time records. By doing so, you violated a policy of the employer and put the company in legal jeopardy.

    Unless you were terminated due SOLELY to a protected characteristic such as your race, gender, religion, etc., there was not only nothing illegal about your termination; I would have terminated you, too. "Singling you out" may or may not have been "wrong" morally or ethically, but except for the reason noted in the previous sentence, it was not illegal. There is no law that requires the employer to treat all employees the same; only that any differences in how employees are treated cannot be in violation of a particular LAW that prohibits such different treatment.

    "I only did it because" is not going to fly with the UI commission, as you have discovered. Here we go with situational ethics again.

    the parking garage was not authorized by me to give any information to my manager,
    Huh? What information was given and what information do you think your manager was not entitled to without your authorization? And what does this have to do with falsifying your time sheets?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for replying PattyMD and I'm not looking for sympathy in any way. What I was falsifying in my time was all done to make sure that I didn't go over my 8 hrs a day and was following the "no overtime policy". As a professional, I'm sure you know that if work needs to get done "it needs to get done". Which is what I did. I worked the same as I was working before but had to make sure that I didn't put down that I worked overtime because "we weren't allowed to". So I had to put down that I took my hour lunch when I didn't take it and worked passed 5pm but had to put down that I only worked till 5pm. That's why they said I was falsifiying my time. I was not in anyway stealing from the company and my manager knew that I was working overtime. I'm almost sure that my manager looked for a way to get rid of me after the conversation I had with him in regards to OVERTIME a couple of months back. He was never the same with me after that. However, it's something that I can't prove. If what I did was so wrong then why are they going to pay me over 100 hrs of unpaid overtime?

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Fam4u View Post
        Thank you for replying PattyMD and I'm not looking for sympathy in any way. What I was falsifying in my time was all done to make sure that I didn't go over my 8 hrs a day and was following the "no overtime policy". As a professional, I'm sure you know that if work needs to get done "it needs to get done". Which is what I did. I worked the same as I was working before but had to make sure that I didn't put down that I worked overtime because "we weren't allowed to". So I had to put down that I took my hour lunch when I didn't take it and worked passed 5pm but had to put down that I only worked till 5pm. That's why they said I was falsifiying my time. I was not in anyway stealing from the company and my manager knew that I was working overtime. I'm almost sure that my manager looked for a way to get rid of me after the conversation I had with him in regards to OVERTIME a couple of months back. He was never the same with me after that. However, it's something that I can't prove. If what I did was so wrong then why are they going to pay me over 100 hrs of unpaid overtime?
        if you were there and not being paid, your company would be in violation... expensive violation.
        Not everything that makes you mad, sad or uncomfortable is legally actionable.

        I am not now nor ever was an attorney.

        Any statements I make are based purely upon my personal experiences and research which may or may not be accurate in a court of law.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yep - non-exempt employees must be paid for all time worked.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment

          The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
          Working...
          X