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  • salary employees

    can salary employees be required to work 7 days a week, 9 hour days?

  • #2
    In what state?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      California

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      • #4
        California law requires an employee to have one day out of seven off. That means that an employee can be required to work as many as twelve days in succession. So the literal answer to your question is yes, they can; however, not EVERY week.

        California is one of only two states which limits the number of hours an employee can work in a week, but nine hours a day, seven days a week is well within the limit. So that is legal as well.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          Interesting. What's the weekly limit in CA?

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          • #6
            According to my source, 72 hours.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              If my company doesn't set a specific time that we are supposed to work until, and I leave after 8 hours, can they count that against me as an occurance? I've been working 6-7 days a week, usually from 9am-8:30pm. On a few ocassions I left before 8:30 and now I got a write up for leaving early. If I'm working so much how do you determine whats fair and whats not?

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              • #8
                Yes, they can. If you leave without permission that is a disciplinary or even a termination offense regardless of how many hours you have already worked. The law does NOT give you the right to decide that you will only work 8 hours a day.

                It doesn't matter whether you think it is fair or not. It only matters what is legal, and your employer is not doing anything illegal.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                • #9
                  I understand if I left without permission, but I was given permission and nothing was said about it being an occurance until this month( which is also the first month I'm not at target to hit quota). Other employees also are given permission to leave or take certain days off but have not been given any occurances( they are on target to hit quot). Shouldn't this occurance policy apply to everyone wether they are hitting quota or not. I was not given any policy guidelines nor was anyone else, so I'm just curious. Thank you for your input.

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                  • #10
                    There is a difference between applying a policy consistantly (which every employer should try to do) and requiring all employees, no matter what the circumstances, to abide by exactly the same requirements. If they want to have a policy that allows people who are hitting quota to leave early but not those who are not, they may. They also may (and depending on circumstances, possibly they must) make exceptions based on individual circumstances.

                    The bottom line is that while you may or may not have been treated fairly, nothing in your post suggests that you have been treated illegally.
                    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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