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TX employer placing conditions before releasing final paycheck

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  • TX employer placing conditions before releasing final paycheck

    I was working for a small trucking company in Dallas, TX. I had given the employer a 2 week notice saying I was going quit (verbal however) The day before the 2 weeks were up, there was an incident where I was picking up a trailer and it disconnected and fell over. I got back to the office and told the boss that there may be somthing wrong with the truck. Without even looking at the truck he insisted that it was my fault. Anyway, I turned in my equipment and told him I quit.

    We had a huge verbal blowout and I admit that I used some foul language. He is a foreigner and his english is not all that good, or so it seems.
    I've contacted him about forwarding the final paycheck by mail. He's constructed the idea that I've somehow made threats against him and has placed conditions for getting my last check.

    1. That I come in to his office and sign 'termination papers'

    2. and that when I come in to the office, he wishes to call the police and have them investigate the nature of the 'threats' that he claims that I've made against him and his family. (I never made any threats)

    I'm not totally worried about the couple hundred bucks he owes me but his accusation that I have threatened him somehow really does disturb me.

    Any thoughts on this situation would be helpful.

    Regards,
    Brian

  • #2
    Originally posted by briant
    I was working for a small trucking company in Dallas, TX. I had given the employer a 2 week notice saying I was going quit (verbal however) The day before the 2 weeks were up, there was an incident where I was picking up a trailer and it disconnected and fell over. I got back to the office and told the boss that there may be somthing wrong with the truck. Without even looking at the truck he insisted that it was my fault. Anyway, I turned in my equipment and told him I quit.

    We had a huge verbal blowout and I admit that I used some foul language. He is a foreigner and his english is not all that good, or so it seems.
    I've contacted him about forwarding the final paycheck by mail. He's constructed the idea that I've somehow made threats against him and has placed conditions for getting my last check.

    1. That I come in to his office and sign 'termination papers'

    2. and that when I come in to the office, he wishes to call the police and have them investigate the nature of the 'threats' that he claims that I've made against him and his family. (I never made any threats)

    I'm not totally worried about the couple hundred bucks he owes me but his accusation that I have threatened him somehow really does disturb me.

    Any thoughts on this situation would be helpful.

    Regards,
    Brian
    Hi Brian.
    Even during this emotional set of circumstances, try to remain calm and clear headed.
    1. Your paycheck is due you and any monies your previous employer wants to collect as damage have to be done through legal channels/ As far as "termination papers" read all before signing if you even do. Your resignation serves as your separation of service.
    2. He may follow through on wanting to call the police, but if you did not threaten him and there is no witness to that fact, chances are you won't be arrested.

    Proceed with caution, knowing that your money is due you regardless of your differences.

    Best wishes.
    Sue
    FORUM MODERATOR

    www.laborlawtalk.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Sue.

      I'm glad you are here. Superb forum.

      Comment

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