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PTO time reset on my hire date instead of calendar year Michigan

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  • PTO time reset on my hire date instead of calendar year Michigan

    Hi, I appreciate you guys reading this!

    So I started a job a year ago. My PTO just reset on my DATE of hire. Is this the norm? I have never worked somewhere where that is the policy.

    I knew my PTO did not roll over into the next year. So I used a large amount at the end of the calendar year and have since been saving it up (5 months worth, or about 35 hours). I just tried to use it and was informed that I only have 3 hours because it had just reset at my date of hire.

    This policy was never communicated with me and their policy says "year of employment."
    to me, year of employment does not mean DATE of employment. I would take it to mean calendar year, or at the very least fiscal year.
    I would also assume that it was purposely written in vague language purposely to trick employees out of their paid time off.

    Do I have any legal basis to ask for those PTO hours back?

    Edit: forgot to add the policy in full
    Exhibit A.

    Paid Time Off is time off an employee can utilize and be paid. It is being provided in lieu of vacation days, sick days, personal days, or any other traditionally designated paid time off.

    Paid Time Off is earned/accrued on a per payroll basis at the rate of 3.077 hours per payroll totaling 80 hours by the end of the year of employment. Unused PTO does not roll over.
    Unused Paid Time Off will not be paid out upon termination of employment. PTO cannot be paid out while employed.
    Last edited by stert; 05-26-2016, 01:30 PM.

  • #2
    There are no laws addressing this question at either the Federal or state level, in any state.

    When your PTO resets is entirely a matter of company policy.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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