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Timesheets Maryland

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  • Timesheets Maryland

    I wanted to poll everyone to see if and how you handle timesheets? Currently we are using the old fashioned fill in your timesheet and sign then the supervisor signs. Before that there was nothing in place, time was just given and entered in to timekeeping by word of mouth (employees called their superintendents). I created this new procedure about 3 weeks ago and for the most part majority of the hourly staff is following the procedure with little to no complaint. But, we have one department that always feels the need to push back and do not want to comply. So now the President and Vice President has come to me to see what can be done to appease that department.

    Any and all feedback is welcome

  • #2
    Timesheets Maryland Maryland

    I wanted to poll everyone to see if and how you handle timesheets? Currently we are using the old fashioned fill in your timesheet and sign then the supervisor signs. Before that there was nothing in place, time was just given and entered in to timekeeping by word of mouth (employees called their superintendents). I created this new procedure about 3 weeks ago and for the most part majority of the hourly staff is following the procedure with little to no complaint. But, we have one department that always feels the need to push back and do not want to comply. So now the President and Vice President has come to me to see what can be done to appease that department.

    Any and all feedback is welcome

    Comment


    • #3
      What can be done is to tell them to comply with company procedures. If you were asked to create a new process and now they aren't backing you, I would not hesitate to tell them, diplomatically, that if they want this to be successful, they need to exercise their managerial authority and make this recalcitrant department comply.

      Comment


      • #4
        Why is this one department refusing to comply?

        Comment


        • #5
          I've merged your two threads; the same people respond either place and it's easier to have everything in one place.

          I'm with the Ferret. If they don't like the new process, too darned bad. That's the process and that's how they do it from here on in.

          To specifically answer your question, all our non-exempt employees (with limited exceptions) complete an online timesheet every week, which then goes to the supervisor for approval. All paid time off has to be approved separately in advance (exceptions can apply for emergencies and for sick time that is not known beforehand). If you don't turn in a timesheet, you get a nastygram from Payroll. I know they threaten not to pay you if you don't get it in; I don't know if they follow through.

          Most of the exceptions are for employees whose jobs do not allow them access to a computer. They turn in paper sheets but I don't know how the get processed from there, since there is no one in my department who fits that description.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

          Comment


          • #6
            While employers do do it, legally the burden is on the employer to know what hours their employees worked, whether they complete a time sheet or not. So it is not advisable to withhold pay until the time sheet is completed. Instead cite them for insubordination and use the other progressive discipline tools in your arsenal-verbal warnings, write ups, unpaid suspension, etc.

            Comment


            • #7
              Apparently the President and the VP want OP to alter the timesheet process so that it's more to the liking of the reluctant department. So taking disciplinary action would probably be a CLM for the OP.
              Last edited by eerelations; 03-30-2016, 07:07 AM.

              Comment


              • #8
                It is difficult to advise you as you haven't mentioned why this one department does not want to comply. What is different about this department versus any other? There can be valid reasons your process won't work for one group and if both the President and VP are asking for an exception, I am inclined to believe there is more to it than one manager who just doesn't want to do this.

                I can tell you in MD that best practice is something in "writing", be it electronic or paper, completed by the employee and signed off by the supervisor. Should the DLLR ever darken your door, that is the first thing they are going to want to see so you are smart to do away with the call it in method.

                It would also be helpful to know the industry, number of employees, and the exempt/ non-exempt breakdown. I'd advise a consulting firm with mostly exempt employees differently than a retail environment with mostly non-exempt.
                I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

                Comment


                • #9
                  If senior management is not supporting you, then game over. Deal with it. We work for them, not the other way around. The "why" is always interesting, but "because I said so" is a perfectly acceptable answer coming from the brass.

                  In the 1980s I worked for a manufacturing company which just put in an expensive new bar code system, which ran the time clocks, but more importantly, tracked all transactions for a 1,000+ workforce. Supervisors were not doing their job, which meant bad/incomplete data, which was causing serious problems with manufacturing. I talked to people, wrote memos, but since I was just payroll, nothing happened. I caught called into the President's office to get yelled at. I had copies of memos I had written, plus a few "F U" responses. The President called the HR Manager in, and asked him how many manufacturing supervisors we had (around 15). He said to pick one at random and fire him. HR manager objected and President said either the randomly selected supervisor is fired by end of day or the HR guy would be. HR guy no longer had a problem and we fired a random supervisor for not doing their job. Next day President announced that he was going to keep firing one supervisor a week until the problem was solved. It got solved overnight.

                  Morale. As long as senior management supports you can do almost do almost anything. If they do not, you can do almost nothing.
                  "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
                  Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

                  Comment

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