Complete Labor Law Poster for $24.95
from www.LaborLawCenter.com, includes
State, Federal, & OSHA posting requirements

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Connecticut Meal Period Questions. Connecticut

Collapse
This topic is closed.
X
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Connecticut Meal Period Questions. Connecticut

    Hello, I currently work at a (fast food chain) in Connecticut. I'm aware that the state requires an employer to provide an unpaid, uninterrupted 30m meal period if working 7 1/2hrs or longer.
    My question is can my employer FORCE an employee to take an unpaid meal period if only working 6hrs if the employee doesn't request a meal period (or break of any kind)

    and if an employee is working 6-7hrs (not 7 1/2 or more) can be denied a meal period (or any other break) understanding that it would be unpaid?
    Last edited by cbg; 07-04-2012, 10:01 AM.

  • #2
    Yes. Any employer in any state can force any employee to take a lunch break. Even if not legally required by state law. Hours are controlled by employer as long as those decisions do not violate an actual law. Telling an employee to take a lunch break when the employee does not want one does not violate an actual law.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

    Comment


    • #3
      Thank you for your reply.

      One more quick question. Since an employer can do such a thing can they dictate when you can or can not take the break? If the employee is in fact only there for say 6hrs can the employee be forced to take the break in his first hour of working? I'm just looking for as much clarification as I can get, I foresee issues like this coming up in the future with some co-workers. We have new Ownership at this store.

      Comment


      • #4
        Unless the state law specifies when the break must be taken, the employer can require that it be taken any time the employer wants it taken.

        In CT, the meal period must be taken after the first two hours of the shift and before the last two hours of the shift. Within that time frame, the employer can require it to be any time the employer wants. Since no breaks other than the meal period are required by law, the employer could require that these breaks be as soon as you report to work, if he so desires.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          Other than what is required by law, the employer makes the rules & not the employee. (minus a binding employment contract to the contrary)
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment


          • #6
            All right. Thank you for the info, you can close up this thread =)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Sorrowfox View Post
              All right. Thank you for the info, you can close up this thread =)
              You're welcome - will close thread per your request.
              Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

              Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

              Comment

              The LaborLawTalk.com forum is intended for informational use only and should not be relied upon and is not a substitute for legal advice. The information contained on LaborLawTalk.com are opinions and suggestions of members and is not a representation of the opinions of LaborLawTalk.com. LaborLawTalk.com does not warrant or vouch for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any postings or the qualifications of any person responding. Please consult a legal expert or seek the services of an attorney in your area for more accuracy on your specific situation.
              Working...
              X