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Employer cut wage out of spite & without notice. Legal?

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  • Employer cut wage out of spite & without notice. Legal?

    Was driving a truck (Class A CDL) for a small company in Iowa. I have had several legitimate complaints with the owner of this company since the day I was hired.

    1) Charged me $55 for pre-employment drug screen on first pay check.

    2) Tried to send me out of town in semi truck with no seat belt, no speedometer, & broken windshield.

    3) I'd worked several Davis-Bacon Act jobs and was never paid the pre-determined federal wages.

    So, last week I'd finally had enough and called the owner him to inform him that I couldn't work for him any longer due to the issues I've mentioned.

    Today, I went to get my last pay check and noticed that the rate of pay was cut to minimum wage ($7.25). He did this out of spite and I'm furious.
    Is this legal??? PLEASE ADVISE!!!

    Also, isn't there a separate minimum wage specific to Class A CDL truck drivers???


    Thanks!!
    reeB

  • #2
    1. Legal, as long as you agreed to it.
    2. May be a DOT violation; have you contacted them?
    3. File a complaint with the federal DOL.


    The reduction to minimum wage on your final paycheck is not legal, unless you knew about it beforehand; for example, if there was an employee handbook or policy published that quitting with no notice would result in this action. If not, file a claim for the difference in wages with the state DOL.

    To my knowledge, there is not a higher MW for CDL drivers unless you are working on prevailing wage, Davis-Bacon, or SCA jobs.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      Many companies have a clause in their employment policies stating that if you do not offer a minimum notice when quitting, your pay is reduced to MW...I've seen it on the board before.
      Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

      I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the quick response regarding this matter!!! ...I certainly doappreciate it.

        It's a fact, ..NO, there is no handbook, no published policy about this at all. So, I've kinda gathered that it varies from state to state as to whether it's legal or not. Are you for sure that it is illegal in my case,given the info I've provided? Please let me know.


        Thanks!
        reeB!

        Comment


        • #5
          Some states have specific laws prohibiting a decrease in your rate of pay without prior notification. Others do not. Iowa is not my state. However, those states which don't always recognize the public policy/fair dealing concept as I stated earlier. The only way you're going to know for sure is to call the state DOL and ask them.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

          Comment

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