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Missouri - Initial payroll for Non-Exempt Employees on semi-monthly payrolls

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  • Missouri - Initial payroll for Non-Exempt Employees on semi-monthly payrolls

    I was hired as a contract by a company not in Missouri three months ago, and changed to salaried full time position on May 10, 2010. Of course I was paid by hours I worked until Friday May 7, 2010. That was fine.

    However, I got surprise when I received my fist semi-monthly pay check as salaried full time employer. I asked HR and got the following calculation:

    From May 1 to May 15, there are 15 days total (including weekend), and I started my full time job May 10, and between May 10 to May 15, there are 6 days total (including weekend), therefore, my first pay check is: 6/15 * myHalfMonthlyRate (5000) =$2000.00.

    When you look at calendar from May1 to May 15, there are 10 business days, I worked 5 of business day (May 10-May 14), Should I get my first pay check as 5/10 * myHalfMonthlyRate (5000) = $2500.00?

    Or more fairly: 5/21 (total business days in May) * 2 * myHalfMonthlyRate (5000) = $2380.95?

    Or much more fairly using HourlyRate ( 5000*2*12/52/40 ) * 40 hours (5 days ) = $2307.69?

    My question is which one the correct one to calculate first pay check in Missouri for Non-Exempt Employees on semi-monthly payrolls?

    Thanks,
    J.

  • #2
    Need a little more information.

    How many hours per week is your salary intended to cover? 40? or more?

    Are you paid in arrears (after the fact) or current (pay period ending date is the same as the check date)?

    And what is the employer's defined workweek?
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

    Comment


    • #3
      >>How many hours per week is your salary intended to cover? 40? or more?

      40 hours exact as a full time job, no overtime.

      >>Are you paid in arrears (after the fact) or current (pay period ending date is the same as the check date)?

      Current(pay period ending date is the same as the check date).

      >>And what is the employer's defined workweek?
      Monday - Friday, 8 hours per day => 40 hours per week

      Thanks,
      Best regards,
      J.

      Comment


      • #4
        All info we needed except the last one.
        The "workweek" as referenced in wage and hour law is a 168-hour period that starts on a day/time certain. What you gave us was your work schedule, which is not the same thing. You can ask your employer, or once we get responses to the two questions below, we can give an example based on an assumption.

        Sorry, two other questions. "Salaried" and "hourly" are merely pay methods. Also need to know if you are exempt or nonexempt; if you aren't sure, describe what your duties are (not your job title). And what type of business is this (not its name)?

        Thanks.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

        Comment


        • #5
          Looks getting complicated now.

          The question is very simple: how to calculate first pay check for Non-Exempt full-time Employees on semi-monthly payrolls? Using start date May 10, 2010 and pay day May 15, 2010 as example?

          Best regards,
          J.

          Comment


          • #6
            I wouldn't be asking the questions if I didn't need the answers to give you a correct response. Your choice.
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

            Comment

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