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non exempt-pay Florida

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  • non exempt-pay Florida

    i would like to know how many hours a day you would need to work to get paid for a full day. i have heard as soon as you walk in the door and start working, you need to be there at least 1 hour, you need to be there at least 4 hours. what is the LAW?

  • #2
    You are talking about "reporting time" or "show up time". Several states have such laws but FL is not one of these very few states. Other then a higher then federal minimum wage, FL has very little in the way of state specific labor law, and frankly does not make much effort to enforce what little state specific labor law that it does have. FL is one of the very few states that does not even have a state department of labor.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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    • #3
      Reporting time, startrng your daily duties. some managers state as soon as you start working , others state you need to be here 4 hours. the right hand does not know what the left is doing.

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      • #4
        one more question, is it the same amount of time if your exempt or non exempt?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by packman15 View Post
          Reporting time, startrng your daily duties. some managers state as soon as you start working , others state you need to be here 4 hours. the right hand does not know what the left is doing.
          There is no LAW at all in Florida regarding "4 hours". Once you start working, you must be paid and that's ALL you must be paid for, whether it's 15 minutes or 1 hour or 4 hours or 8 hours (assuming we're talking nonexempt; if exempt, it's not the same question).
          Last edited by Pattymd; 12-23-2008, 12:02 PM.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by packman15 View Post
            one more question, is it the same amount of time if your exempt or non exempt?
            Is what the same amount of time?
            I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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            • #7
              Patty,

              Thank you, is there somewhere I can this information on the internet. I would like to pring it out for my human resource department, since I am being docked. I was here over an hour and had a family emergency. even though i work 9-10 hours a day on a regular basis, yet some managers come in late are here for 5 minutes and leave for hours or even the rest of the day.

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              • #8
                If you are a non-exempt employee, you must be paid for all time worked whether it be an hr. (or more or less) per the FLSA.

                http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs22.pdf

                Exempt employees get paid a fixed weekly salary no matter how many hrs. they work during the week. (they could work 25 hrs. or 50 hrs. during the week & they would get the same pay)
                Last edited by Betty3; 12-23-2008, 05:45 PM.
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