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Demotion with a reduction in pay (Arizona)

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  • Demotion with a reduction in pay (Arizona)

    I work for a city in Arizona. I have a co-worker who played a prank on another co-worker and was fired for it. It went to arbitration and the city was found to be in the wrong for firing the guy but the demoted him and took away $5.00 an hour from his current wage. Is it legal to take pay when an employee has been demoted? We had a similar incident a few years ago where they demoted a guy but didn't he didn't lose pay.

    I also have another question. I sent an email to a co-worker about a change in the way we were doing tours. I am in charge of public education but it usually falls to this co-worker to schedule the tours. I did not refer to her in the email at all I just said this is the way we are going to schedule tours and she complained to my boss and I received a poor review and a less then expected raise because my boss felt that I was being rude to the secretary. I asked how he knew my feelings from an email and he said he felt the tone of the email was rude. He admitted that he did not know how I was feeling or what tone I was writing in when I wrote the email. I took the matter to human resources and they sided with my boss. I'm not sure if this is against the law but it really stinks to have work in this type of environment.

  • #2
    Originally posted by bodezzz View Post
    I work for a city in Arizona. I have a co-worker who played a prank on another co-worker and was fired for it. It went to arbitration and the city was found to be in the wrong for firing the guy but the demoted him and took away $5.00 an hour from his current wage. Is it legal to take pay when an employee has been demoted? We had a similar incident a few years ago where they demoted a guy but didn't he didn't lose pay.

    I also have another question. I sent an email to a co-worker about a change in the way we were doing tours. I am in charge of public education but it usually falls to this co-worker to schedule the tours. I did not refer to her in the email at all I just said this is the way we are going to schedule tours and she complained to my boss and I received a poor review and a less then expected raise because my boss felt that I was being rude to the secretary. I asked how he knew my feelings from an email and he said he felt the tone of the email was rude. He admitted that he did not know how I was feeling or what tone I was writing in when I wrote the email. I took the matter to human resources and they sided with my boss. I'm not sure if this is against the law but it really stinks to have work in this type of environment.
    Yes, it's legal to demote an employee & reduce his wages unless there is a bona fide employment contract or CBA addressing the issue of demotions & pay to the contrary. It seems this case went to arbitration. All employees do not have to be treated the same as long as they aren't discriminated against due to a reason prohibited by law. (ie age, religion, gender) The other employee's situation might not have been exactly the same.

    There was nothing illegal done by your employer in giving you a poor review & a less than expected raise (raises aren't even required to be given unless they are guaranteed per a binding employment contract or CBA) as long as you weren't discriminated against due to a reason prohibited by law. (ie age, religion, gender)
    Last edited by Betty3; 12-21-2008, 12:40 AM.
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