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Personal Pay Refusal South Carolina

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  • Personal Pay Refusal South Carolina

    I work for a very large company and I am an hourly worker. Recently I put in for personal pay and I was refused. My employer stated that my reason was not good enough to merit personal pay. However everyone else in the company simply fills out a paper and is paid no questions asked. Even vacations are paid this way. Is there any action I could take legally to get paid? I feel I am being singled out by even having to give an excuse, even though it was adequate. Our HR is a company puppet and he is of no help to me.

  • #2
    I don't know what you mean by personal pay. Please clarify.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Some might call it sick pay. It is officially called personal time pay at work. We can take it in hourly increments. We are given 72 hours per year.

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      • #4
        What was your reason for requesting it? What restrictions does company policy put on its use?
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          I had to take my daughter to school. Our handbook says something about the manager has the right to approve all time off. But, as far as I know, I would be the first one who was ever asked to provide an excuse and the first to be denied for at least 10 years.

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          • #6
            Okay. So why do you think you were refused?

            Taking your daughter to school is not a valid reason for what you describe as sick pay.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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            • #7
              It is not "sick" pay. I only renamed it it so you could understand it. It is meant to be used in hourly increments for any personal reason. Vacation pay can only be used in 8 hour increments. The only reason I can think of as to why it was refused, is because my supervisor had an all -employee meeting and he is mad at me because I was unable to attend. There were others out that day who got paid, but they used a vacation day and were out all day.

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              • #8
                I see nothing illegal done by your employer. It would only have been illegal if you were singled out just because you were in a protected "class." (ie age, religion, gender). All employees do not have to be treated the same.
                Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

                Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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                • #9
                  I am in a protected class, but I am not making an argument for discrimination. What I am asking is: Can a company's standard procedure, or policy, that it has followed for years simply change for one person. The handbook may state that management has the right to approve time off in regard to work load, but doesn't precedence matter? I have seen whole work lines at work simply put in for vacation and personal pay and have it approved with no questions asked. If there ever was a time for disapproval, this would be the time. What has happened in my case is simple in my opinion: my supervisor is mad at me for missing a meeting that he fealt everyone should have attended and this is a retaliatory action against me on his part. It is to punish me and to discourage others in the future. Do judges or mediators take precedence in consideration when listening to cases? Or do they just follow the letter of the law?
                  Last edited by 11rufus11; 03-15-2008, 04:04 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Everybody is at least in three "protected classes", race, gender, and national origin. It's not that you are IN a protected class, it's only illegal discrimination if the REASON for the refusal was because of a protected characteristic. Otherwise, not all employees need to be treated the same.

                    Why did your supervisor say he/she was denying the time?
                    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                    • #11
                      If there was a mandatory meeting that day, I can understand why the time would be refused, particularly where the handbook says, "management discretion". I seriously doubt that you can say for absolutely certain that there has never been a situation where another employee has ever been denied time.

                      Even if you are 100% correct about the reason, refusing discretionary time because he is mad at you for missing a mandatory meeting is not illegal retalitation.
                      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                      Comment

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