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one last question Texas

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  • one last question Texas

    OK here's the last one. I am a mechanic in TX. I repaired a customer's vehicle and informed the service advisor that one of the sensors relating to the customer's concern (but not replaced) may be starting to fail. The customer took the vehicle and has returned 6,000 miles later. The sensor I mentioned at the previous repair finally failed and now the customer was wanting something done (they were irate and felt the car had not been repaired properly the first time). The service manager confirmed I had diagnosed this potential problem, but when pressed by the customer agreed to cover the labor if the customer paid for the part. When it was all said and done I was not paid for the repair. Instead I was told I should have followed my gut and sold the repair the first time. Is it legal to have me perform work like this for free? I'm especially confused since they made the customer pay for the part but will not compensate me for my time. Any help would be grateful, thanks.

  • #2
    This is a variation of the other answer I gave (one more reason to put all related questions in the same thread).

    The employer (almost always) must pay Non-Exempt employees for actual hours worked. The employer can fire the employee for messing up (or for doing a great job or because it is Arbor day, or for any other reason not directly prohibited by law), but they cannot refuse to pay for hours worked.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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