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Subordinate w/higher salary South Carolina

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  • Subordinate w/higher salary South Carolina

    I am a county employee in South Carolina, and I have a direct subordinate who makes app. $1500 a year more in salary than I do. I have the greater responsibility, longer job description, etc., etc.. He has about 2 yrs more experience than I do, but I have been a supervisor for 4, where he was just promoted in June. Are there any defined SC laws on direct subordinates in Gov. jobs making more than their supervisors? Or is that just policy in some places?

  • #2
    Originally posted by lawdog05 View Post
    I am a county employee in South Carolina, and I have a direct subordinate who makes app. $1500 a year more in salary than I do. I have the greater responsibility, longer job description, etc., etc.. He has about 2 yrs more experience than I do, but I have been a supervisor for 4, where he was just promoted in June. Are there any defined SC laws on direct subordinates in Gov. jobs making more than their supervisors? Or is that just policy in some places?
    If this was not a government job, I would say there is no law against a subordinate making more than their supervisor. I would assume the same applies to gov. jobs though unless your county has a law/regulation to the contrary.
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    • #3
      I understand that years of service sometimes applies, but at the same time, there is not a large difference in this situation. Another point that could be brought up is if I were a female, or a minority, there would be an obvious Equal Opportunity violation here. But since we are both white males, that is not even considered and I don't know where to go next.

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      • #4
        What is the big deal with a subordinate making more than the supervisor?

        If you check the pay tables for the military, you will see that a 2nd Lieutenant with less than two years of service makes less than a staff sergeant with six years of service.

        The LT has a bachelor's degree and leads a platoon of 35 soldiers, including three staff sergeants. The staff sergeant has a high school diploma and leads a squad of 10 soldiers.
        Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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        • #5
          I'm not talking military, but if you want to talk military we can. Look at the pay scale for that second Lt. in 3 years. Then he automatically makes 1st Lt., and in three more years he's a Captain. If a SSgt made it in six years, it will probably take him another five or six to make E7, in that same time span that 2nd Lt is now a Captain making quite a bit more than the E7. The military doesn't do many things that make sense, so that's not the best reference point.

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          • #6
            You also mentioned education. I have a B.S. and my co-worker does not, but I am with a Sheriff's Office where education is not considered in pay grade.

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            • #7
              There is nothing in the law of any state and nothing in Federal law that prohibits a subordinate making more than their superior.

              There MIGHT be a muncipal or county law about it, but that's something you would have to take up with them.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by lawdog05 View Post
                The military doesn't do many things that make sense, so that's not the best reference point.
                It was to illustrate that it is not unusual for a lower ranking position to have greater pay than a higher one. You will find the same if you look at the pay grades and steps for other federal workers http://www.opm.gov/oca/07tables/html/gs.asp and, I suspect, state, county or municipal employees in most places.

                You have heartburn that someone lower than you is being paid more but you won't be able to show anyone that this is illegal, because it is not.
                Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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