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Quitting without notice & pay rate West Virginia

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  • Quitting without notice & pay rate West Virginia

    If an employee quits without notice, is the employer required to pay their full wage, or just the minimum wage?

  • #2
    In the majority of states, you cannot reduce someone's wage retroactively. The employee must be notified of the reduction prior to working any hours at the lower rate.

    So unless WV is one of the few exceptions, or the employee is well aware of a company policy that if they do not give notice they will only be paid minimum wage, they still must be paid their full wage.

    Patty? Scott? DAW?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      I know zip about West Virginia. I would be very uncomfortable taking such an action without something very clear spelling things out well ahead of time. Unless the OP thinks that things were spelled out well ahead of time, file a wage claim. Worst case is that you do not get it.

      This sort of raises a different point. If the employer thinks through things ahead of time and properly structures their compensation structure, certain actions become legal that would not be legal in a reactive mode. If I was working for a firm that wanted such a policy, I would want both a written policy to that affect, plus to make the employee sign a statement at time of hire acknowledging the policy. And I would not want my managers to get to selectively enforce this policy.

      Not the question, but IMO I dislike the policy and would argue against it.
      "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
      Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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      • #4
        I agree. It may be legal, but that doesn't make it right.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment

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