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Unpaid Overtime Pennsylvania

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  • Unpaid Overtime Pennsylvania

    I work a 12 hour day in Pennsylvania and am required to stay an extra 15 to 20 min. after the shift. Should I be paid for this extra time? Just paid for this time, not necessarily overtime pay?
    Last edited by philbro; 12-21-2006, 06:51 PM. Reason: To stress straight time pay for extra 15 min.

  • #2
    As a point of clarification, overtime is not earned on a daily basis. It's earned once 40 hours has been physically worked during the course of the workweek. PA law does not restrict the number of hours that your employer may require you to work in one day. Since no such provision exists, you could be required to stay an additional 15 or 20 minutes even if you have already worked 12 hours on that day.

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    • #3
      IF you were scheduled to work 12 hours, but were kept on and worked 12.25 hours, you must be paid for 12.25 hours. If any of those hours worked put you over 40 hours for the work week, then overtime rates would apply to those hours only.
      Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

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      • #4
        Another clarification: for federal law, it also depends on your job and whether you are exempt or non-exempt. What is your job title - - more importantly, what do you actually do day to day?

        How many hours a week do you work?

        Your state laws may apply and offer some help also, but I'm not familiar with Pa laws.
        Any advice provided does not create an attorney-client relationship. This is a public forum and therefore no confidentiality is assured. Attorney Joel Grist does not enter into an attorney-client relationship without a written representation agreement.

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