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timeclock-15 min periods-not paid

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  • timeclock-15 min periods-not paid

    I live in Texas. At my company, we clock in and out on a timeclock. Everyone is hourly except for the owners and office manage who don't clock in. The clock is set on a 15-minute periods. If you clock in at 7:46am, you don't start getting paid until 8:00am. Sometimes, if you clock in at 7:45am you still don't get paid until 8:00am! If you clock out at 4:59 pm, you only get paid until 4:45. Is this legal? The owners and office manager are aware of employees' complaints about it. Thanks for any advice.

  • #2
    It is legal to round time within 15 minutes but it has to be consistant, no matter who it benefits. If they round you up to 8:00 when you clock in at 7:50 instead of taking you back to 7:45, then if you clock out at 5:05 they have to round you up to 5:15. They can't have it both ways.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      time clock-15 min intervals- docking pay

      The company has been having it both ways...we're losing time on either side of the clock. So what can we do legally? Is there a site where I can print this out this information for the owner? The Federal Labor Law site was no help. The office manager is the one who sets the time clock. Is the owner liable? Thanks!
      Last edited by KB1; 12-16-2006, 07:51 AM. Reason: spelling

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      • #4
        I can't give you a site where you can print it out; maybe one of the payroll people can.

        What you can do legally, if the employer refuses to change what they are doing, is file a complaint with the state DOL.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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        • #5
          cbg stated the application of this regulation:
          http://www.dol.gov/dol/allcfr/ESA/Ti...9CFR785.48.htm

          In Texas, the state DOL is called the Texas Workforce Commission. Contact them, unless you want to confront the employer with the above.
          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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