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Cutting Wages, which labor code is it? California

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  • Cutting Wages, which labor code is it? California

    I am not sure were to ask this.

    I know it is illegal to cut an employees wages. For example their current pay is $10.00 an hour and in a written warning you cut their pay to $8.00 an hour. The problem I am currently having is finding the labor code that relates to this to bring to my boss to convince him that we need to correct this because it is illegal.

    If you could please tell me which labor codes cover this I would greatly appreciate it.

    Sincerely,
    Rachel
    Last edited by wildflower13cat; 09-22-2006, 11:45 PM.

  • #2
    Generally speaking, the only restrictions on cutting an employee's pay are:

    a) notice must be given in advance of the work being performed (state laws may dictate how long in advance, but most would allow this to be done immediately before the shift is to begin).

    b) the new rate of pay cannot be less than minimum wage.

    What your company proposes to do is quite legal.
    Senior Professional in Human Resources and Certified Staffing Professional with over 30 years experience. Any advice provided is based upon experience and education, but does not constitute legal advice.

    Comment


    • #3
      There are no labor laws in any state making it illegal to cut employee wages.

      The only restrictions are as Scott has already described. And in some states, even those restrictions do not hold. For example, in Florida there is no requirement that the employee be given advance notice.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

      Comment

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