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  • overtime pay

    hi, i was wandering if it is legal in the state of florida for my employer to take my overtime hours and put them on next weeks check as regular hours so they dont have to pay overtime. can anybody please give me some advice thanks.

  • #2
    Originally posted by range32448
    hi, i was wandering if it is legal in the state of florida for my employer to take my overtime hours and put them on next weeks check as regular hours so they dont have to pay overtime. can anybody please give me some advice thanks.
    No it is not legal. For hourly, non-exempt employees, all hours over 40 worked in a single work week must be paid at overtime rate.
    Sue
    FORUM MODERATOR

    www.laborlawtalk.com

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    • #3
      Overtime

      Keep in mind, however, that an employer can set his or her own workweek. While a traditional workweek usually begins at 12:01 am on Sunday and ends at midnight on Saturday, some employers may have a workweek that begins on Monday, Tuesday or even Wednesday, etc. It's just that overtime must be calculated based on a set workweek and the employer cannot change the workweek from week to week, to avoid paying overtime.

      Let us know if you have any other questions.
      Lillian Connell

      Forum Moderator
      www.laborlawtalk.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by LConnell
        Keep in mind, however, that an employer can set his or her own workweek. While a traditional workweek usually begins at 12:01 am on Sunday and ends at midnight on Saturday, some employers may have a workweek that begins on Monday, Tuesday or even Wednesday, etc. It's just that overtime must be calculated based on a set workweek and the employer cannot change the workweek from week to week, to avoid paying overtime.

        Let us know if you have any other questions.
        How many breaks does a employer have to give in a 10hour day? We get a 45min lunch

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        • #5
          Originally posted by [email protected]
          How many breaks does a employer have to give in a 10hour day? We get a 45min lunch

          There is no federal law to mandate break or rest periods. However, when employers do offer short breaks (usually lasting about 5 to 20 minutes), federal law considers the breaks work-time that must be paid.

          What state are you in?

          You can go to this site to view indivdual STATE LAWS concerning breaks and rest periods.

          http://www.dol.gov/esa/programs/whd/state/rest.htm

          Best wishes,
          Sue
          Sue
          FORUM MODERATOR

          www.laborlawtalk.com

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          • #6
            :eek I like to take breaks as much as the next guy. But bathroom breaks are not even close to being a break when you have to clean the toilet seat of fecal matter before you can use it.
            Originally posted by [email protected]
            How many breaks does a employer have to give in a 10hour day? We get a 45min lunch

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            • #7
              Sue, the poster stated that he was in Florida. Florida law does not require breaks or meal periods.
              I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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              • #8
                The original post, and Sue's and Lillian's responses, were all over a year ago.
                The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                • #9
                  oops. Sorry. I've GOT to start checking that.
                  I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

                  Comment

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