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did my hospital do something illegal? Texas

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  • did my hospital do something illegal? Texas

    Recently, my hopital held a "mandantory" meeting which included passing out a copy of their position on unionization. I don't have a problem with that but the meeting also included a short film about unions. the film was said to be an educational film regarding the facts about unions.

    However, it seemed more like one of those mud-slinging polital ads televised during polital elections. The point of the film seemed to be to scare people away from unions. I don't know anything about unions, I've never been contacted by one, but I felt it was inappropriate for my company to foist this biased film on us in a mandantory meeting and call it "factual" or "educational".

    I would like to know if this act might even be illegal and who do I complain to about it.

  • #2
    So....what you are saying is that it's okay for a union to come in and tell you how terrible management is, but it's not okay for management to present their view of unions?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      It's called Union Avoidance and the company has every right to make their employees aware of the pitfalls as they see them. As cbg stated, the company has the right to give it's point of view just like the union. You need to look at it as though you were running the company.
      Somedays you're the windshield and somedays you're the bug.

      Comment


      • #4
        re: did my hospital...

        Thank you, JoeC, for your response and information. The other two replies misunderstood my objection. I don't mind the hospital reminding us of their position on unions, I just took offense to the film. And perhaps, that wouldn't have been so bad if they hadn't called a "mandantory" meeting and called the film "educational" and "the facts about unions". The film gave very little real info on unions and delivered the message, through a "skit" with actors, a scenerio of hospital employees talking to a union rep in the nurses lounge, then incidents of union reps calling nurses in the middle of the night, and other situations of general harrassment by reps and/or other employees who are for the union. They stressed the importance of not signing a "blank check" (the union card) The whole film reminded me of those creepy politcal ads seen during election campaigns.

        I havn't even ever thought about a union, or been approached by anyone, but apparently some nurses have. NOW.., I'm curious. after doing a little research on my own, I not sure that a union would help or hurt those issues which I feel strongest about. But, I prefer to do the research myself. I'm trying to hear both sides as well as opinions from people who have experienced union representation in a hospital setting. I just didn't think it was appropriate for the hospital administration to try to influence me in the method they chose.

        Here's an analogy: If a woman goes into a bar, and a man approaches her with "Hey baby, great legs...ya wanna...." , that woman can, without any consideration or concern regarding her livelyhood, respond "Get lost, jerk!"

        No laws broken, really no harm done.

        But if that man happens to be her boss and he makes this remark at work, the current laws come into play. Why?... because the current laws want to make sure the woman feels safe in her work environment, but more importantly, she should be able to refuse his advances and not feel that she might have hurt her career.

        Ok... maybe thats a seedy example, but I hope I've explained how I feel in a way that those other two responders get it.

        Thanks again.

        llorn93

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by joec
          Non union shops can get higher production by replacing older workers with younger ones. So when they show their charts about Union shops getting less production than Non- union this has to be factored in.
          JoeC
          Actually, this is illegal whether you are union or not. If the employer is using age as the determining factor, specifically being over 40, that is illegal any way you slice it. Even with a union and seniority provisions an underperforming worker may be terminated on the basis of productivity. It doesn't matter the age as no law or union contract states you must keep someone on board who is not performing the job to legitimate expectations.

          I do agree though that having a union isn't the kiss of death many employers feel. I have 3 here I deal with daily and have a fairly decent working relationship with each. Sure it may prolong certain processes and it may add a few more steps to some situations, but it doesn't have to be an entirely adversarial relationship.
          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

          Comment


          • #6
            I just don't see that a union contract would change the situation for many posters here or elsewhere. Lots of employees have problems with their unions as well. There isn't perfect solution.

            Nor does every union protect the most senior worker. Any employer who terminates employees over 40 "at will" is taking a huge chance. While htey can be let go for any reason or no reason, in actuality there better be a darn good reason or you will find yourself explaining yourself to the EEOC. I would also be cautious of generalizing what "older workers" are like. Not every older worker is slower or less adept than a younger one. In some cases the employee who has been doing the job for decades is more dedicated and efficient than the one who is more junior.

            You have to be careful using message boards like this asrepresentative of the workplace as a whole. This is a self selective group and no one comes here to post that they are happy at their job and treated well. They only post when they are upset. Plus, we only get one side of the story.
            I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

            Comment


            • #7
              llorn93.....Responding to your post, no law was broken by the companys actions ( again, judging from your post.) Since there wasn't an organized attempt, or an official demand from the employees to unionize, the employer has every right to inform its workers on the subject. Granted, your perception of their intent may very well be correct, but according to your description of the meeting, they only made it mandatory. I assume the clock was still running? Anyway, until they show signs of prohibition and interference, you just have to welcome all information on the subject, as you stated you are going to do. On this note, remember this when deciding, a union is only as strong as its solidarity among its members and its ability to execute its request in honesty and fairness.
              Some live and learn while some learn to live

              Comment


              • #8
                Tough Decision

                First, what your employer did is completely legal and it sounds like you will have a choice to make in the near future. Here's what will happen. The union will make every promise in the world to entice you to vote for them. They can't and won't keep them. Your employer will tell you we REALLY care about you and we will take care of you. They don't and won't.

                In the final analysis, it's up to you to manage your career. If it's a bad company and you vote the union in, you'll still work for a bad company but you'll get to pay dues to a union too. My advice...if it's a good company, vote for them when/if you have an election. If it's a bad company...vote with your feet and find a good one.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jake53
                  Here's what will happen. The union will make every promise in the world to entice you to vote for them. They can't and won't keep them. Your employer will tell you we REALLY care about you and we will take care of you. They don't and won't.
                  A glass is half-empty view ...

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by rjc
                    A glass is half-empty view ...

                    That glass isn't half empty, it is bone dry.
                    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Actually....

                      it's a glass that has gone through 60+ union drives. If you think unions make good on all promises, then you have an education ahead of you. Similarly, if you think the days of company loyalty to employees are still here like they were in the 40's through 70's, then I want some of what you are drinking.

                      Bottom line...it is up to each employee to manage their own career. Giving over complete control of your career to anyone else is a mistake.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Joec

                        Thanks for your thoughts. By the way, which union are you affliated with?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          joec

                          That phrase "unionbusting" is a catchy...I think I may have already heard that somewhere.

                          I find it hilarious that when the union guys are talking to employees they call it free speech but when the employer talks to them they call it "unionbusting".

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I find it hilarious that when the union guys are talking to employees they call it free speech but when the employer talks to them they call it "unionbusting".
                            it's called union busting because that is the sole intent of the act joe. how can you compare the two acts as equal, the company can force you to listen to thier opinion, the union can only ask you to listen.....doesn't sound much like a level playing field to me.......kinda like comparing apples to edsels....imho

                            oh yeah....IAMAW '03 to present...and **** proud of it!!!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Noiddodge

                              The simple fact is that the employer is paying the employees for their time and has the right to have the meeting. Get used to it.

                              The knife cuts both ways however. The union can visit employees at their homes while the employer cannot. Also the union can legally make any promise during the drive while the employer cannot.

                              You do have one thing correct...the playing field is not level. I only ask that you be honest enough to admit that it is tilted on both sides.

                              Comment

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