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22hrs overtime!!!!!

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  • 22hrs overtime!!!!!

    I'm in Michigan, and just a student working at an advertising agency. I was fired along w/ another student for not being able to work a SATURDAY and SUNDAY overtime that total up passing 22hrs!!!! Can someone please tell me if i can file for something or get help. i just want a fair treatment. I dont want to be pushed around just because im a student. i was not even given an explaination to why i was fired and that my supervisor didnt even hear me out what so ever!! please someone give me advice!!!

  • #2
    Best advice, work the overtime if it's required.

    The simple rule is, the employer sets the hours, if they require OT, then you can be terminated for not working it.

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    • #3
      Being a student is irrelevant. Any other employee could be fired for refusing overtime; a student can too. There's no different laws for students.
      The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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      • #4
        I am not saying just because im a student i get "special" treatment in terms of laws. But to me, this seems to be a case of FORCED LABOR. Especially when the overtime was under 24hrs of notice. The law to my understanding saids i'm not required to do anything against my will outside of my regular hours, and besides..my "set schedule" is monday-firday and IF i am open, i am willing to do overtime.

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        • #5
          Your understanding is incorrect. Mandatory overtime is legal in all 50 states. It is the employer's opt, not yours, when you work. Your regular shift is irrelevant; if they want you to work additional hours, that's perfectly legal and so is firing you for refusing.
          The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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