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Law that defines full time from part time? / TX

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  • Law that defines full time from part time? / TX

    HELLO EVERYONE!!!!

    What is the law that states what defines full time employment from part time employment in TX. Where can I find it?

    Thanks in advance,
    Brian

  • #2
    There is no law that defines full time employment from part time employment. Full time employment is whatever the employer says it is.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Come on now... Their has got to be some type of guideline or standard to be followed or adhere to. Else a/an employer can say that 60-70-80 hours a week (Mon-Sun) is full time. Thier is a law that dictates how many cocecutive hours an employee is able to work. Your saying that they (the employer) can make up whatever hooplaa they want concerning full time hours and that they can call you a part time employee all the while working to what the general public knows as full time (40 hours)...? Find that alittle hard to swollow.

      Comment


      • #4
        Come on now... Their has got to be some type of guideline or standard to be followed or adhere to. Else a/an employer can say that 60-70-80 hours a week (Mon-Sun) is full time. Most employers CHOOSE to define 40 hours/week as full-time status but no laws require that. The only legal requirement is that non-exempt employees who work more than 40 hours in a week be paid overtime.

        Thier is a law that dictates how many cocecutive hours an employee is able to work. If there is (outside of specialty occupations such as pilots, truck drivers, etc.), then I haven't come across it. A few States require "one day of rest in seven" but that's it.

        Your saying that they (the employer) can make up whatever hooplaa they want concerning full time hours and that they can call you a part time employee all the while working to what the general public knows as full time (40 hours)...? The general public is wrong. As I said, the majority of employers have elected to use 40 hours as designating full-time status but no laws require that. I've never heard of any employer whose policy is that an employee must work 60+ hours to be full time. That would be a dumb business decision. Some companies use 37.5 hours, the majority 40, and a few 45 hours but it can be whatever number of hours the employer wishes.

        Find that alittle hard to swollow. Then I suggest you wash it down with a beverage.

        Comment

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