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Full time and part time status

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  • Full time and part time status

    What are the hours set for a full time employee and a part time employee in the state of SC?

  • #2
    Whatever the employer designates them to be.
    I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by sedgington View Post
      What are the hours set for a full time employee and a part time employee in the state of SC?
      There isn't any statute in South Carolina that mandates what FT or PT are. That is set by the employer.
      Somedays you're the windshield and somedays you're the bug.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by ElleMD View Post
        Whatever the employer designates them to be.

        slight change to this question:

        if one (in SC) had a part time employee (say 15-30hrs/week), and then for a period that employee was to work up to 40hrs/week. Would an employer be required to treat the employee as a permanent full-time employee with benefits given permanent full-time employees?

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        • #5
          "Required" by whom? The government? If we are talking private sector employers, there is generally speaking no law making the "part time" vs. "full time" distinction. Some companies internally make this distinction. I have worked for several of them. But this was a distinction that the company came up with all by themselves without the government telling them to do it. Some companies can have Collective Bargaining Agreements which spell this out. Some governmental employers have very tight rules in this area, and seem to jump through a lot of hoops to keep employees either temporary or part time to avoid benefits. But there is no one-size-fits-all answer here. Different companies can and do have different rules on this. And most companies have no rules at all on this.
          "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
          Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by DAW View Post
            "Required" by whom? The government? If we are talking private sector employers, there is generally speaking no law making the "part time" vs. "full time" distinction. Some companies internally make this distinction. I have worked for several of them. But this was a distinction that the company came up with all by themselves without the government telling them to do it. Some companies can have Collective Bargaining Agreements which spell this out. Some governmental employers have very tight rules in this area, and seem to jump through a lot of hoops to keep employees either temporary or part time to avoid benefits. But there is no one-size-fits-all answer here. Different companies can and do have different rules on this. And most companies have no rules at all on this.

            thanks for the clarification. I own a business which offers several benefits to 'permanent full-time" employees. However, we also retain a number of college students who work part-time year-around, but during summer and break months, may work up to 40hrs/week. We treat them as part-time employees not permanent full-time.

            The distinction is important, so as to prevent employee demands for benefits which we have not intended.

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            • #7
              Assuming that you are a private sector employer, several things can happen.
              - Your actions (policy manuals, written statements, verbal statements, past practice) can cause enforceable "rules" to occur that are not externally imposed by the government. This is not always obvious or automatic and different states can have very different views on this subject. There is some advantage to having your rules formally spelled out in a policy because absence this it is possible for an employee to claim in court a set of implied rules that the employer never formally created. Formal policies can establish rights to the employee that would maybe not otherwise exists but the same policies can help establish limits on those policies which would otherwise be guessed at in a court action.
              - Benefit providers sometimes have rules. I am not saying that this is the case here with part time vs. full time, but any time you have a benefit policy, it is worth while talking to your benefit provider. This tends to be something that they are (or should be) expert on.
              - States can impose rules. MA and health coverage for example. To the extent you are using a benefit provider, one would like to think that the benefit provider understands the governmental imposed rules for the state.
              "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
              Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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