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Full time status Oregon

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  • Full time status Oregon

    I understand that there is no set standard for the number of hours considered full time. However, I was hired as a full time employee and always received 40 or more hours per week. In the past year, my employer has cut my hours and I am lucky if I get scheduled 30 hours per week. Last week I was schedule only 20 hours.
    Now my boss claims that full time is actually only 30 hours per week in order to get benefits.
    Does this policy then have to apply to all full time employees? Others are still receiving their 40 hours per week consistently and have never had them cut. Shouldn't it be a standard that applies to all full time employees?
    I feel that I am being treated differently and unfairly because other full time employees have the standard at 40 hours per week for them.
    Thank you

  • #2
    I don't understand the question. Are you asking whether or not the boss must legally cut everyone's hours if he cuts yours?
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by cbg View Post
      I don't understand the question. Are you asking whether or not the boss must legally cut everyone's hours if he cuts yours?
      I want to know if the employer can say that 30 hours a week is now considered full time for me, but 40 hours is full time for everyone else in the company.
      Isn't there a standard that should be set for the company?

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      • #4
        Are *all* other full time employees getting 40 hrs.? If so, why do you believe you aren't?
        Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

        Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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        • #5
          ohbusymom, Your reply to cbg's question wasn't there when I typed my first post - you got yours submitted off first.

          They can change your hrs. to 30 hrs. & consider that full-time as long as you aren't discriminated against due to a reason prohibited by law (ie age, religion, gender) or unless you have a binding employment contract to the contary.
          Last edited by Betty3; 12-27-2009, 01:08 AM.
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

          Comment


          • #6
            The boss is trying to get me to quit. Her way of doing so is to cut my hours. First, it was benefits being cut (my health insurance was always part of the pay package, not an added benefit). Now, my hours are cut. When asked, I was told that "full time" doesn't mean 40 hours, it is actually only 30 to get benefits. (even though I am paying for the health benefits now)
            However, every other full time employee has maintained their 40 hours per week.

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            • #7
              So, what makes you think that full time for benefits is 40 for everyone else and not 30? Just because their hours haven't been cut doesn't mean that the benefit line is different for them than for you.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by cbg View Post
                So, what makes you think that full time for benefits is 40 for everyone else and not 30? Just because their hours haven't been cut doesn't mean that the benefit line is different for them than for you.
                No, I didn't mean that they had to work 40 hours for benefits. My real question was what constitutes full time within the company? Shouldn't it be the same for all employees?
                When I questioned my boss about continuing to get 40 hours because I am full time, I was told that they only had to schedule me 30 hours because that was the minimum to qualify for benefits (vacation, holidays, etc...).
                So, why are the other full time employees having the established minimum for full time status as being 40 hours?
                For example: If a company says "full time employment is 32 hours per week" then I would think all full time employees would get a minimum of 32 hours per week, not just the boss' favorites.

                Comment


                • #9
                  There is nothing in the law requiring that full time status be the same for all employees with a couple of caveats; with regards to ERISA based benefits (which would include health insurance), the company must adhere to whatever it says in the plan document; and any differences cannot be based on a characteristic protected by law (race, religion, national origin and so forth).

                  Other than that, if the company wants to have a different rule for every employee they may do so.
                  The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                  Comment

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