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  • Labor Law Oregon

    Is falsifying information for termination illegal?

  • #2
    A lot more information would be useful.
    "Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away".
    Philip K. **** (1928-1982)

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    • #3
      Labor Law States Other

      I can provide proof of the allegations.

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      • #4
        Labor Law Oregon

        If an individual in management falsifies information to terminate another illegal yes or no regardless of the situation?

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        • #5
          Wrongfully Terminated

          I guess no one can answer. Difficult question. Plain and simple but no response. Did I hit a glich?

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          • #6
            Chill. This is not Time Life. There are no operators standing by 24/7. All responders are volunteers who do this on their own time. You are going to have to show a little bit of patience.

            You are also going to have to be a lot more forthcoming. In general, employers need not have proof in order to fire you. Wrongful termination does not mean that you did not do what you were accused of doing. It means that there is a law which makes it illegal to fire you for the reason they did.
            I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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            • #7
              Wrongfully Terminated

              I made a comment not ment to offend anyone in a timely manner. If you took it that way my apology.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by gracieperez63 View Post
                I made a comment not ment to offend anyone in a timely manner. If you took it that way my apology.
                The employer has no proof. The HR wants to settle with me as of today. But comments from hear prove to be different from what they have said
                I'm confused
                sorry

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                • #9
                  There doesn't have to be proof. As long as the reason they are terminating you does not violate the law, and from your previous post it is clear that no laws were violated, it is entirely legal to terminate you. It doesn't matter if you can prove what did or did not happen.
                  I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

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                  • #10
                    Wrongfully Terminated

                    okay thank you!

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                    • #11
                      falsifying information

                      falsifying information on behalf of management legal or not. Meaning if a person accuses you illegally do I have a claim against the individual or the company they work for?

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                      • #12
                        You do not have a claim against the company. You have been told that over and over and the answer is not going to change no matter how many times you ask it.

                        If you can prove first, that what was stated was false (not an opinion that you disagree with, but factually incorrect) and secondly, that the person who stated it KNEW or should have know that it was incorrect, you MIGHT, repeat, MIGHT have a claim against that individual. YOU have the burden of proof not only to show what actually happened, but also to prove that the person who made the false accusation KNEW it was false.
                        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gracieperez63 View Post
                          falsifying information on behalf of management legal or not. Meaning if a person accuses you illegally do I have a claim against the individual or the company they work for?
                          It would help if you used complete sentences. It isn't clear what you are asking or if you are just commenting.

                          If someone accuses you of something, it is legal for management to believe them. No, they do not have to prove it is true. Yes, it would still be legal even if they lied about it entirely. The only time it would be illegal to fire you is if they violated a law in doing so. There are no laws that prohibit lying.

                          If someone made up something about you- not had a difference of opinion, was mistaken, or didn't investigate- and you suffered some sort of tangible harm as a result, there is a remote chance it would fall under slander/libel laws but that does not make your termination illegal. Note that slander/libel is very hard to prove and would be a civil action against the person who made the statement, not the employer for believing it. A supervisor who terminated you for reasons you disagree with or for things you did not do is not guilty of either.
                          I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

                          Comment

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