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Mississippi 6 hour shifts how many breaks, lunches?

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  • Mississippi 6 hour shifts how many breaks, lunches?

    How many breaks and lunch a part-time employee working 6 hours a day shift in Starkville entitled to? if there is any online guide/resource with complete details of hours, breaks, lunches etc. Thanks

  • #2
    Mississippi law does not require that you be given any breaks at all, rest or meal, regardless of how many hours your shift is.

    Mississippi has very few labor laws; possibly fewer than any other state in the US. There are no state laws regarding breaks (meal or rest),hours worked, overtime, minimum wage, etc.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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    • #3
      Are there any laws in MS. about a minimum time off in between work shifts? I sometimes have to work 8pm-4am then come back for a 7am-4pm. Also, i'm young, and well, i'm kinda interested in why there are not more labor laws in MS.

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      • #4
        No, as a matter of fact, there are no laws in ANY state regarding time between shifts for general employment (although there are some mandated by other agencies/public safety jobs, such as the DOT for truckers, or the FAA for airline pilots).

        Now, you mention that you are young. If you're under 18, the federal laws regarding child labor apply and you can research that here.
        http://www.dol.gov/dol/topic/youthlabor/index.htm

        And there are no state laws regarding these issues because the state legislature has not seen fit to pass them. Sorry.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          OK. Thnx for answering that last question =).

          I have another though; Are there any laws on forcing someone to work over 16 hours in a 24 hour time period in MS?

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          • #6
            No there is not. This is at the discretion of the employer. The employer sets the work schedule and is free to change it as sees fit. As pattymd already correctly mentions, very few limitations exist on work hours. The two most common are for truck drivers and airline pilots. The boss could require you to work 24 hours a day.

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            • #7
              There are no laws in any state that limit the number of hours that can be worked per day, at least for general employment. As indicated, a very few specific industries where there is a public safety factor have limits, but as a general rule an employee can be required to work 24 hours a day. It would be stupid, but legal.

              In addition, only two states have any laws addressing the number of hours that can be worked in a week or a pay period. Maine does not permit an employer to require an employee to work more than 80 hours of overtime in a 2 week period; CA does not limit the number of hours an employer can ask an employee to work, but the employee has the right to refuse work, without penalty, if they have already worked 72 hours or more within the work week.
              The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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              • #8
                Ok. Thanks again for the fast responses.

                Now, I wanted to ask you guys where you get your answers from. There is for a fact a law stating that an employee can not be made to work more than 16 hours in any given 24 hour period. That being said, was the information given to me about the amount of time alowed in between shifts false as well?

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                • #9
                  I'd be interested in hearing about this new information. Please provide a reference. Thanks.

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                  • #10
                    As a point of reference, Title 71 is where you'll find Mississippi labor code. You'll see that there is not much there.

                    http://www.mscode.com/free/statutes/71/index.htm

                    I do not see anything there that you've just mentioned.

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                    • #11
                      I do not have any "law site" references. Everything I have been informed on about this information comes from the company i work for. Every once in awhile they will pass around memorandums. I know that the company had gotten into some trouble about making people work over 16 hours in a 24 period, and the memos they sent around were saying that no one under any circumstance would be permitted to work over 16 hours in a day again....

                      Unless the company in question simply decided they didn't like the way they were doing things, and wished to change it without problems, then I will still have to say there are laws pertaining to this subject. Considering that the company works 24 hours a day, 349 days a years (7 days closed) I do not think they would have any reason for not wanting to work people over this amount of time.

                      I will not try to argue my point further, but honestly... does it really make since that in the year 2006, there are no labor laws in regards to scheduling?

                      -Crazy

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                      • #12
                        This sounds more like company policy. However a company could mandate 24 hour shifts (if it so chooses). In certain industries, 24 hour shifts is not so uncommon.

                        I don't disagree that employees should have additional rights under labor code. The problem is that lawmakers have not seen it necessary to amend or pass additional legislation. Federal law nor Mississippi (Title 71) law does not address the issues that you've presented. Since it's not addressed by law, the actions presented are not unlawful.

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                        • #13
                          Crazy, you can say that there are laws all you want to. But until you can show us the law, we are standing by our previous statements.
                          I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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                          • #14
                            In the absence of a law prohibiting (or requiring) a certain action, the right of any employer to take (or refuse to take) that action is assumed.

                            So unless you can show us a law that says an employee cannot be required to work more than 16 hours in day, then an employer can require them to work 18, or 20, or 24 hours.

                            Since Robb has already presented you with the appropriate link, why don't you show us in that where that law exists?

                            As to your final point, the laws in this country provide for minimal government interferance in private affairs (both private individuals and private business). So yes, actually, it does make sense that in the year 2006 there would be no laws about scheduling.
                            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

                            Comment

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