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Conflicting Schedules and being "late" Florida

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  • Conflicting Schedules and being "late" Florida

    I would like to start off by saying thanks for any qualified advice I receive from this.

    Recently I showed up to my shift that started at 1:15pm(or at least I had every reason to believe), only to show up at 1:02, in which the boss tells me I'm late, in which I got sent home, and am still awaiting going to my next scheduled shift, to see if I get written up for it.

    Here's the pertinent background info:

    There are 2 schedules available. One is posted online, instructions on how to log in are provided by employer.
    The other is available at work, in the employee area. This one is somewhat tricky, as we are scheduled by stations, or work areas, for which area of the business we will be working for that shift. To match up with the schedule, there is a document that contains the times we are required to be in at work, for each station. The times required to be at work depends on, and changes according to what station we are scheduled, what day of the week, and an AM or PM shift.
    The schedule online has both the time required to be in, and also the station.

    For the particular shift in question for which I was "late", the schedule online said I was in at 1:15. The schedule at work, or the "times-in" sheet, said for Monday I was in at 1:15. What I failed to see(or didn't even know I needed to look for!) was a disclaimer at the bottom of the "times-in" sheet, it said that Monday, Sept 6th Labor day was to be treated as a Saturday or Sunday as far as the "times-in".
    As I walk into work at 1:02, thinking I'm early, I'm told by the manager that I'm late, and I'm sent home.
    I honestly feel like this is some kind of dirty trick. A way to get rid of employees in a slow time of year.
    What I'd like to know is, what are my legal options? What are my legal rights? Am I held responsible for being "late", despite the conflicting schedules? In the eyes of the law what time was I supposed to be there? Even more importantly, what are my employers options, and rights?
    Can they even send me home without work (and without the money I would have made from that work) for being 2 minutes late?

    I'm not sure if it makes a difference, but I wasn't the only one that this happened to, for the same shift on the same day.
    This wouldn't be the first time getting written up for being late, but I'd hate to get reprimanded for this even if it's only a writeup, for an error which I don't believe to be my responsibility.
    Last edited by mong1294; 09-06-2010, 11:01 AM.

  • #2
    What is considered "late" is defined by the employer; the law doesn't care about schedules or write-ups.

    Yes, you can legally be sent home, even if you were on time.
    I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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    • #3
      So let me make sure I understand what your saying.

      I was sent home under the premise of being late. That's the issue at hand.

      If I'm understanding you right, in this instance, it's whatever they say goes, and if they say I'm late, then it doesn't really matter what I do or what I say?

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      • #4
        That's correct. The law does not mandate how the employer handles this situation.
        I don't respond to Private Messages unless the moderator specifically refers you to me for that purpose. Thank you.

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        • #5
          The employer must follow the law when making policy; however, Patty is correct, there is no law stating they, the employer, cannot send you home for being one second late, or really for any or no reason, as they see fit.
          Not everything in America is actionable in a court of law. Please remember that attorneys are in business for profit, and they get paid regardless of whether or not you win or lose.

          I offer my knowledge and experience at no charge, I admit that I am NOT infallible, I am wrong sometimes, hopefully another responder will correct me if that is the case with the answer above, regardless, it is your responsibility to verify any and all information provided.

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          • #6
            Sorry, but I have to agree with the other responders. What your employer
            did was legal. (no law against it)
            Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

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