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Question about Pay for Mandatory Meetings?? FL Florida

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  • Question about Pay for Mandatory Meetings?? FL Florida

    Hi,
    I just got a new job at a local cell phone company, and they are requiring me to go to 2 days of training in Tampa FL, approx. 1 hour away from my home. The training will take place on 2 days, from 9am-7pm. They are paying the hotel for the 1 night and food expenses, although they are not paying me for gas or vehicle compensation, not to mention i am not getting paid for the 20 hours worth of training during the 2 days.

    So pretty much I am going to end up paying 40 dollars in gas round trip, just to stay in a hotel for free for a night and not get paid for 20 hours of mandatory training??? Is this legal, i could understand if it were voluntary then okay but not being paid for a mandatory training doesnt make any sense to me.

    I do like the job, and it will lead to decent money, but its the principle of the matter. I d ont want to get fired over questioning the pay for the meeting if i am not in the right, can anyone please give me some insight and advice on this matter, and if i were to get fired of this matter what could i do since florida is a right to work state.

    Thank you,
    JG

  • #2
    If you are a non-exempt employee, you must be paid for all hours/time worked including mandatory training/meetings. I might mention I believe you meant at-will state & not right to work state. Right to work just means you can't be required to join a union or pay union dues to be able to get a job.

    http://www.dol.gov/esa/whd/regs/compliance/whdfs22.pdf
    Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

    Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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    • #3
      thank you

      thank you for your response betty, now one more question, say i refuse to go the meeting without proper compensation and they decide to terminate my employment or they give me an ultimatum that if i dont go then i can find another job, what are my options from there?

      I also asked the manager and he said that i would be 1 out of 150 employees actually asking to get paid, which means they are not paying alot of employees the proper pay for these meetings, what could i do if were fired?

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      • #4
        oh and what is an at will state?

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        • #5
          If you don't go to the meeting, your employment can be terminated for refusing to follow an order & get the necessary training. You need to go to the meetings/training & then file a wage claim (if you don't get pd. for the time) with the US DOL (Fl. has no DOL). The other option if they end up not paying you for the time, would be to sue your employer in small claims court for your wages due.

          at-will employment:
          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/At-will
          Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

          Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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          • #6
            To save your looking, every state except Montana, and even sometimes including Montana, is at least nominally an at-will state.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

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