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I need to Quit- Can I get unemployment Florida

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  • I need to Quit- Can I get unemployment Florida

    Good morning: This is my first time visiting and so thankful I found this forum. I have been a manager at a company for almost 10 years. We are in the real estate industry and as you know, things are very slow. We have gone from 20 some employees to 4 who are down to 4 day work weeks including myself. My salary has been cut and of course no commissions whatsoever. I have also taken on all aspects of running the office to include bookkeeping, AP/AR and Payroll in addition to my normal duties of running the office, marketing customers and closing transactions. Those of us here are under such stress because we never know when the day is we are closing. We are hanging by a thread. I just don't know how much longer I can hang on, but cannot afford to rip myself out of unemployment. However, the job is becoming unbearable....there simply is not enough funds to pay the bills of running the office day to day. I am constantly fending off bill collectors every day....this is stressing me out to no end. This is not my company and I cannot keep continuing to deal with the problems with the office, not to mention the owner of the company took a job in another industry. We are here just not knowing what is next. I get harrassing emails and calls about how much income we have and what bills I need to pay from him. It's just not a pretty picture. If I quit, would this be a circumstance that I would qualify to get unemployment due to the conditions under which I am forced to work at this time? Thanks

  • #2
    The standard to quit and receive benefits is VERY high. I seriously doubt that this would meet the standard and I would truly hesitate to encourage you to do so, since you and not I would suffer the consequences if I am wrong. Not to mention the fact that in the current economy, any job is better than none and there is no guarantee how long it would take for you to find something else.

    However, depending on how much your salary has been cut, it may be that you will qualify for partial benefits while you continue to work. Few states will pay you to quit so that you have NO income instead of SOME income. Many states will pay partial benefits to offset a salary cut.

    I am not even remotely unsympathetic but I truly don't believe this is a qualifying event to quit.
    The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

    Comment


    • #3
      My salary has been cut 30% and of course no commissions whatsoever. I do know that I have a job....but in reading about unemployment....they do consider the circumstances under which you were working....and I do not feel it is my place to have to deal with the company bill collectors every single day...the owner makes payment arrangements with them, which we cannot possibly meet, then he leaves me to talk with them and put them off. This is truly becoming so stressful to me, it is effecting my health. I do not run my own personal finances this way. The employees in the office answer the phones and hear the bill collectors as well. It is just not a good situation...I just didn't know if this was a situation that was considered "bad working conditions" or something like that and if the State would be on our side. When you are breaking down to tears everyday because you don't know what to tell these demanding people about the bills....it effects you emotionally. Also, so if that is not a good reason, if the first time we don't get paid, we leave the job....is that a valid reason to file and quit, since we obviously didn't get paid for our work?

      One other question, if my salary gets cut more, do I have to accept it or say no thank you and leave? I know it sounds like I am grasping at straws...I guess we all are right now....LOL

      Comment


      • #4
        All I can suggest is that you call the unemployment office and ask them if this is a qualifying event to quit and get benefits. I am not willing to take the responsibility of telling you anything more definite than I already have. I'm not the one who will be left without income if you quit because I tell you you'll get UI and the UI office countermands me.
        The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

        Comment


        • #5
          Thanks, cbg....I would never want you to tell me what to do. I was really just hoping maybe someone had been in a similar situation and could tell me the results they had. I know you feel for me and the others here, it is really just tough and unbearable, and I also do so appreciate your input and responses. I was actually looking up a labor law attorney here in town just to run my scenario by when I found this website....so for right now, I'll just grin and bear it and get through the tears each day until I just cannot stand it anymore and it won't matter whether I get UI or not...LOL...thanks again

          Comment


          • #6
            I've been in a similar situation so I know what you're going through. I wish I could give you something more definite but it's just not clear when the ALJ will approve on something like this and when they won't.
            The above answer, whatever it is, assumes that no legally binding and enforceable contract or CBA says otherwise. If it does, then the terms of the contract or CBA apply.

            Comment

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