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Whistle blowing questions California

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  • Whistle blowing questions California

    Last year, my company (non-profit) got cited for some environmental safety violations – resulting in the shutdown of some aspects of our operations. While the company didn’t get caught until last year, many of the violations had been happening for years under the full knowledge and direction of our CEO. Based on the financial extent of some of the disrepair/fines, it now appears we are hitting some budget shortfalls and some layoffs could happen. While I don’t think my job is at risk, it bothers me that some people might lose their job due to what I believe is the negligence of our CEO (who will keep his job).

    While I am sure our board has access to the financials for the repairs/fines, I am not sure they are fully aware of the extent/duration of the wrongdoing that occurred prior to being cited. I believe they may have been told that some of fixes were necessary - i.e. didn't meet code- I’m just not sure they were given the full picture. Again, I don’t know what they know - the level of disclosure is speculation on my part.

    If I decided to go the board with documentation on the wrongdoing, is there a statute of limitations on presenting such information (i.e. - did I have to report it immediately)?

    Would my job be protected as a whistle blower in this situation?

    Thank you

  • #2
    Whistleblower protections generally apply only to reporting misdoing to law enforcement or regulatory agencies, not reporting up the chain of command within an organization. Your job would not be protected in a situation such as you have described.
    I am not able to respond to private messages. Thanks!

    Comment


    • #3
      California prohibits an employer from retaliation against an employee for disclosing information to a government or law enforcement agcy. if the employee reasonably believes the information was a violation of a state or federal law or regulation.

      In your situation (what you want to do) I don't see any job protection.
      Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. Leo Buscaglia

      Live in peace with animals. Animals bring love to our hearts and warmth to our souls.

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      • #4
        Honestly, I am not sure what you hope to gain. The board knows enough to ask any questions they feel necessary to ask. Running behind an investigation which has already been completed to report issues they already know about serves no purpose other than to be a potentially career limiting move. You are either giving them information they already have or information they chose not to seek.
        I post with the full knowledge and support of my employer, though the opinions rendered are my own and not necessarily representative of their position. In other words, I'm a free agent.

        Comment

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